• Offered by Asia-Pacific College of Diplomacy
  • ANU College ANU College of Asia and the Pacific
  • Classification Specialist
  • Course subject Diplomacy
  • Academic career Postgraduate
  • Course convener
    • Prof Geoffrey Wiseman
  • Mode of delivery In Person
  • Offered in Second Semester 2018
    See Future Offerings

This course examines in detail a range of contemporary issues that present challenges for diplomatic practitioners and which appear to demand innovative diplomatic responses. There are an increasing number of global and regional issues which can only be managed through diplomatic processes, not through the use of force. But how best to manage these issues is exceptionally challenging. For example, the increase in violent international terrorism is putting the debate about whether diplomacy is a necessary but not sufficient management under the spotlight. Moreover, there are other types of challenges that are the result of new methods of practicing diplomacy, such as digital diplomacy and network diplomacy. Into the mix, the increasing networks of state-based diplomats and non-state actors, raise questions about the exact nature of diplomatic challenges from the perspective of the different players.   
These challenges raise practical and intellectual questions. For example, in a globalising and interdependent world exactly what comprises states' interests and who decides - how do the representatives of the state, the state-based diplomats, attempt to reconcile their state's national interests around issues that require collective action. What does sovereignty mean today and how do state-based diplomats and non-state actors frame and negotiate sovereignty? How are global and regional multilateral institutions and regimes negotiated and in whose interests and values? Is international law or politics the structure that directs diplomatic agency and practice? Does the analysis of diplomatic practices concerned with contemporary diplomatic challenges provide generalisations that inform a theory of practice?
 

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

1. Recognise, analyse and explain why particular frames, or cognitive maps, such as those based on legal, ethical, economic, socio-cultural, political or security factors, are adopted and others rejected by different diplomatic actors involved in contemporary diplomatic challenges. 

2. Evaluate the extent to which the responses of different diplomatic actors to diplomatic challenges are explained by such factors as norms based on law and justice or interests based on power and sovereignty.

3. Analyse and evaluate the practices of state-based and non-state actors in managing diplomatic challenges and explain whether or not an examination of these practices informs a critical reading of theoretical propositions in academic literatures.

4. Explain the nature of contemporary diplomatic challenges, including those in the Asia-Pacific, and design diplomatic strategies for managing them.

Indicative Assessment

Assessment for the course will take the form of three Assessment Tasks, worth 25%, 35% and 40%. 


1. 3,000 word essay worth 25% of the total mark (Linked Learning Outcomes 1, and 2). 

2. 4,000 word essay worth 35% of the total mark (Linked Learning Outcomes 3, and 4). 

3. The third task is an exam (four question of 1,000 words) worth 40% of the total mark (Linked Learning Outcomes 1, 2, 3, 4).

The ANU uses Turnitin to enhance student citation and referencing techniques, and to assess assignment submissions as a component of the University's approach to managing Academic Integrity. While the use of Turnitin is not mandatory, the ANU highly recommends Turnitin is used by both teaching staff and students. For additional information regarding Turnitin please visit the ANU Online website.

Workload

Students undertaking this course could expect a workload of 20 hours a week. This is inclusive of actual contact hours for lectures and also out of class preparation time.

Requisite and Incompatibility

To enrol in this course you must be currently enrolled in either the Master of Diplomacy or Master of Diplomacy (advanced) program. Other cognate fields may request consent.

Prescribed Texts

A compilation of prescribed readings will be distributed to students at the beginning of the semester.

Fees

Tuition fees are for the academic year indicated at the top of the page.  

If you are a domestic graduate coursework or international student you will be required to pay tuition fees. Tuition fees are indexed annually. Further information for domestic and international students about tuition and other fees can be found at Fees.

Student Contribution Band:
Band 1
Unit value:
12 units

If you are an undergraduate student and have been offered a Commonwealth supported place, your fees are set by the Australian Government for each course. At ANU 1 EFTSL is 48 units (normally 8 x 6-unit courses). You can find your student contribution amount for each course at Fees.  Where there is a unit range displayed for this course, not all unit options below may be available.

Units EFTSL
12.00 0.25000
Note: Please note that fee information is for current year only.

Offerings and Dates

The list of offerings for future years is indicative only

Second Semester

Class number Class start date Last day to enrol Census date Class end date Mode Of Delivery
9761 23 Jul 2018 30 Jul 2018 31 Aug 2018 26 Oct 2018 In Person

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