• Offered by School of Literature, Languages and Linguistics
  • ANU College ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences
  • Classification Transitional
  • Course subject Humanities
  • Areas of interest Digital Humanities
  • Academic career Postgraduate
  • Mode of delivery In Person
  • Co-taught Course HUMN2002

The digital age is changing our interaction with information profoundly. The printed book and newspaper is under threat, the publishing industry is undergoing significant change, and issues surrounding information, such as freedom of information, copyright, and intellectual property, and the very ways in which we read, write, understand, and communicate are being debated and reconsidered. This course seeks to place these debates in historical perspective by exploring the history of information in the modern age. A history of information and an examination of issues surrounding information transmission and use will equip students to think critically and creatively about information and knowledge in contemporary life. The course will draw on a variety of disciplines and methodologies, thereby introducing students to issues in print history, communication and media studies, and information studies.  Specific topics that will be studied include: the impact of the 'print revolution'; information and empire; the development of the publishing industry and how it shapes knowledge; information wars and propaganda; and the development of the Internet and its impact on information, knowledge, and communication.

Learning Outcomes

Upon Successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
  1. demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of critical issues in the history of information and its contemporary dimensions;
  2. analyse and discuss at an advanced level the ways in which information has shaped aspects of modern culture and society;
  3. examine and critically evaluate research data, theory, and methodology relating to the history of print, information, and communication;
  4. identify and critically analyse at an advanced level key theoretical and methodological approaches to the history of information
  5. Design and produce a major research project demonstrating understanding of theory, method and research in the history of information.

Indicative Assessment

Critical reflections (4 x 750 words; 10% each) throughout the semester; 3,000 words, 40% (LO 1, 2, 3, 4)
Final essay; 3000 words, 50% (1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
Tutorial Participation; 10% (1, 2, 4)

The ANU uses Turnitin to enhance student citation and referencing techniques, and to assess assignment submissions as a component of the University's approach to managing Academic Integrity. While the use of Turnitin is not mandatory, the ANU highly recommends Turnitin is used by both teaching staff and students. For additional information regarding Turnitin please visit the ANU Online website.

Workload

130 hours of total student learning time made up from: a) 36 hours of contact over 12 weeks: 24 hours of lectures and 12 hours of tutorials; b) 94 hours of independent student research, reading and writing.

Requisite and Incompatibility

You are not able to enrol in this course if you have previously completed HUMN2002

Prescribed Texts

Weekly readings will be provided through Wattle.

Preliminary Reading

James Gleick, The Information: A History, A Theory, A Flood

Indicative Reading List

Martyn Lyons, A History of Reading and Writing in the Western World, Palgrave, 2010.

Jeremy Black, The Power of Knowledge: How Information and Technology Made the Modern World (2014)

Toni Weller (ed.) Information History in the Modern World: Histories of the Information Age (2011)

Specialisations

Fees

Tuition fees are for the academic year indicated at the top of the page.  

If you are a domestic graduate coursework or international student you will be required to pay tuition fees. Tuition fees are indexed annually. Further information for domestic and international students about tuition and other fees can be found at Fees.

Student Contribution Band:
Band 1
Unit value:
6 units

If you are an undergraduate student and have been offered a Commonwealth supported place, your fees are set by the Australian Government for each course. At ANU 1 EFTSL is 48 units (normally 8 x 6-unit courses). You can find your student contribution amount for each course at Fees.  Where there is a unit range displayed for this course, not all unit options below may be available.

Units EFTSL
6.00 0.12500
Note: Please note that fee information is for current year only.

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