• Class Number 5868
  • Term Code 3260
  • Class Info
  • Unit Value 6 units
  • Topic On-campus'
  • Mode of Delivery In Person
  • COURSE CONVENER
    • Dr Ian Elsum
  • LECTURER
    • Anton Pemmer
    • Dr Ian Elsum
  • Class Dates
  • Class Start Date 25/07/2022
  • Class End Date 28/10/2022
  • Census Date 31/08/2022
  • Last Date to Enrol 01/08/2022
SELT Survey Results

This course introduces participants to the conceptual foundations, behaviors and mindsets of entrepreneurship and innovation. The course provides the theoretical foundations and contexts within which innovations and new ventures contribute to economic activity and an introduction to the tools and frameworks used to identify new venture opportunities and potential innovations. It also provides an opportunity for participants to consider how entrepreneurship and innovation processes may impact their future careers. The course is delivered in the form of seminars supported by readings, cases, exercises and individual and team assignments.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

  1. Describe basic concepts underlying the domain of Entrepreneurship and Innovation
  2. Identify problems, challenges, needs, opportunities for the use of innovation in existing organisations and in new ventures
  3. Critique the tools and frameworks used in innovations and new ventures
  4. Evaluate ideas, relationships, resources and networks by engaging E&I
  5. Integrate concepts and theories with real cases of E&I
  6. Reflect on the personal significance of E&I in their future careers

Research-Led Teaching

The content of this course builds upon extensive experience in the strategic management of applied research and extensive involvement in practitioner-led research aimed at improving the effectiveness of the management of technology-based innovation, with a particular focus on the challenges of business model innovation in established firms; management of major/radical innovation; management of high-uncertainty R&D projects; open innovation networks; commercialisation of major inventions from public research institutes; and strategy formation in new ventures.

Field Trips

There are no field trips in this course.

Additional Course Costs

There are no additional class costs expected in this course.

Examination Material or equipment

Course materials - copies of lecture slides, pre-readings, etc. - are permitted.

The ANU Examinations Office will communicate all exam details directly to students.


Required Resources

Weekly pre-reading material will be provided through the Wattle course site.

A list of recommended reading will be provided through the Wattle course site and will be available online (except in limited circumstances where hardcopy only exists)

Staff Feedback

Feedback will be provided continuously through in-class discussions each week. Short case study discussions and workshop exercises will give course participants the opportunity to regularly appraise and apply their knowledge.


Assignments on pre-readings, due in week 6, and analysis of a case study, due in week 12, will give course participants the opportunity to gauge their understanding of course concepts.


 A quiz, taken online following seminar 6, will give course participants the opportunity to gauge their progress against the course learning outcomes. 


Examination of a topic in innovation or entrepreneurship, parts of which are due in weeks 9 and 11, provides the opportunity for course participants to apply evidence-based analysis to a topic in entrepreneurship and innovation and to communicate a synthesis of their analysis..


Feedback on written assessments: see the descriptions of assessment tasks.

Student Feedback

ANU is committed to the demonstration of educational excellence and regularly seeks feedback from students. Students are encouraged to offer feedback directly to their Course Convener or through their College and Course representatives (if applicable). The feedback given in these surveys is anonymous and provides the Colleges, University Education Committee and Academic Board with opportunities to recognise excellent teaching, and opportunities for improvement. The Surveys and Evaluation website provides more information on student surveys at ANU and reports on the feedback provided on ANU courses.

Class Schedule

Week/Session Summary of Activities Assessment
1 MODULE 1: INNOVATION Introduction The nature of innovation and why and how innovation and entrepreneurship are important for firms. The concept of a dominant design Seminar consisting of lecture sessions, discussion questions, discussion of pre-readings and in-class exercises. Pre-reading: (1) Marsili & Salter, ‘Inequality of Innovation: skewed distributions and the returns to innovation in Dutch manufacturing,’ Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Vol. 14, No. 1-2, pp. 83-201. Read sections 1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 and 5 only and answer the following question in 100 words or less: Pre-reading (2) George Castellion and Stephen Markham, New Product Failure Rates: Influence of Argumentum ad Populum and Self-Interest, Journal of Product Innovation Management, Vol. 30 (2013), No. 5, pp. 976 - 979.
2 Types and sources of innovation Novelty, the role of search and framing in innovation, and various types of innovation. Seminar consisting of lecture sessions, discussion questions, discussion of pre-readings and in-class exercises. Pre-reading: Benner & Tripsas, ‘The influence of prior industry affiliation on framing in nascent industries: the evolution of digital cameras,’ Strategic Management Journal Vol. 33, pp. 277-302 (2012)
3 Uncertainty and learning The concept of uncertainty and the relationship between novelty, uncertainty and innovation. The importance of learning through both testing and discovery in an environment of inherent uncertainty. Seminar consisting of lecture sessions, discussion questions, discussion of pre-readings and in-class exercises. Pre-reading: Rice et al., ‘Implementing a Learning Plan to Counter Project Uncertainty,’ MIT Sloan Management Review, Vol. 49, No. 2, pp. 54 –62 (Winter 2008)
4 Innovation ecosystems Factors influencing the rate of adoption of innovations and the concepts of the innovation ecosystem, the path to impact, adoption chain risk and complementary innovation risk. Seminar consisting of lecture sessions, discussion questions, discussion of pre-readings and in-class exercises. Pre-reading: J. F. Li, & E. Garnsey, ‘Building joint value: Ecosystem support for global health innovations’, in R. Adner, J. E. Oxley, & B. S. Silverman (Eds.), Collaboration and competition in business ecosystems. Advances in Strategic Management, Vol. 30, pp. 69 – 96 (2013)
5 Capturing value from innovation How organisations capture value from innovation, including the role of complementary assets and business models as mechanisms for the creation and appropriation of value. Seminar consisting of lecture sessions, discussion questions, discussion of pre-readings and in-class exercises. Pre-reading: Chesbrough & Rosenbloom, ‘The role of the business model in capturing value from innovation: evidence from Xerox Corporation’s technology spin-off companies’ Industrial and Corporate Change, Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 529-555 (2002) Assessment item: Pre-reading assignment one The first pre-reading assignment, worth 5% of the course assessment, is to be submitted to Turnitin in accordance with the assessment instructions.
6 The innovative organisation The ambidextrous organisation and how organisations build the capability for continuous innovation. Key concepts introduced in the innovation module will be reviewed. Seminar consisting of lecture sessions, discussion questions, discussion of pre-readings and in-class exercises. Pre-reading: Tushman & O’Reilly III, ‘Ambidextrous organizations: Managing evolutionary and revolutionary change,’ California Management Review, Vol. 38, No. 4, pp. 8 –30 (Summer 1996). Assessment item: Innovation module on-line quiz Following the completion of the innovation module in Week 6, course participants take an on-line quiz to gauge their learning of the content of this module. The quiz is primarily true/false questions with a small number of multiple-choice questions. It is worth 10% of the course assessment.
7 MODULE 2: ENTREPRENEURSHIP Entrepreneurship and new ventures 1. What is entrepreneurship? 2. Why are new ventures important? Seminar consisting of lecture sessions, discussion questions, discussion of pre-readings and in-class exercises. Pre-reading: (1) P Davidsson, Ditching Discovery-Creation for Unified Venture Creation Research. Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice On-line First 7 July 2021 (2) HH Stevenson and JC Jarillo, A Paradigm of Entrepreneurship: Entrepreneurial Management, Strategic Management Journal Vol.11 Special Issue: Corporate Entrepreneurship, pp. 17 – 27 (1990) (3) T Neumann, The impact of entrepreneurship on economic, social and environmental welfare and its determinants: a systematic review. Management Review Quarterly Vol. 71, 553–584 (2021)
8 Opportunities 1. Entrepreneurial opportunities (in established firms and independent start-ups) 2. How opportunities are identified, discovered or created. 3. New venture creation (in established firms and independent start-ups) Seminar consisting of lecture sessions, discussion questions, discussion of pre-readings and in-class exercises. Pre-reading: (1) S Shane, Prior Knowledge and the Discovery of Entrepreneurial Opportunities, Organization Science, Vol. 11, No. 4, pp. 448-469 (2000) (2) SA Alvarez and JB Barney, Discovery and creation: alternative theories of entrepreneurial action. Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, Vol.1, No. 1–2, pp. 11–26 (2007)
9 Stakeholders, relationships, networks and resources (the ecosystem) 1. The role and functions of entrepreneurial ecosystems. 2. Stakeholders and other key players in the creation and development of new ventures - in established firms and independent start-ups. 3. Resources and dynamic capabilities. Seminar consisting of lecture sessions, discussion questions, discussion of pre-readings and in-class exercises. Pre-reading: ?B Spigel, The Relational Organization of Entrepreneurial Ecosystems, Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice Vol.41, No.1, pp. 49 – 72 (2017). Assessment item: Topic in innovation or entrepreneurship Part 1 An annotated bibliography in which you summarise your search for, and evaluation of, evidence about your chosen topic. It is worth 10% of the course assessment.
10 Developing a new venture: tools and processes New venture concept development processes, including: · needs and value propositions; · customer engagement; and · the business model as a holistic tool. Seminar consisting of lecture sessions, discussion questions, discussion of pre-readings and in-class exercises. Pre-reading: F Cosenz and G Noto, A Dynamic Business Modelling Approach to Design and Experiment New Business Venture Strategies, Long Range Planning, Vol.51, pp. 127 – 140 (2018).
11 Developing a new venture: the business case Building and communicating the business case. · Assessing the feasibility of a new venture. · Planning and negotiating access to resources. · Different approaches to building the case for implementation. Seminar consisting of lecture sessions, discussion questions, discussion of pre-readings and in-class exercises. Pre-reading: 1) F Delmar and S Shane, Does Business Planning Facilitate the Development of New Ventures? Strategic Management Journal, Vol. 24: pp. 1165–1185 (2003) (2) A Ganguly and J Euchner, Conducting Business Experiments, Research-Technology Management, vol. 61, issue 2, pp. 27 – 36 (2018) Assessment Items: Topic in innovation or entrepreneurship Part 2 A poster (approximately 700 words) in which you communicate your synthesis of what’s known about your chosen topic; in-class presentation week 11. It is worth 10% of the course assessment. Topics and detailed instructions will be available on Wattle by week 4. Topic in innovation or entrepreneurship Part 3 A 5 minute podcast in which you communicate your synthesis of what’s known about your chosen topic for an audience of practitioners; due end of week 11 (Friday 21October 2022). It is worth 10% of the course assessment. Topics and detailed instructions will be available on Wattle by week 4.
12 How new ventures evolve and develop over time. What drives the growth and development of new ventures and how their growth trajectories unfold over time. Seminar consisting of lecture sessions, discussion questions, discussion of pre-readings and in-class exercises. Pre-reading: E Garnsey, E Stam and P Heffernan, New Firm Growth: Exploring Processes and Paths, Industry and Innovation, Vol. 13, No. 1, pp. 1 – 20 (2006). Assessment item: Case analysis Applying the concepts from this course to a case study; opens on Monday in week 11; due end of week 12 (Friday 28 October 2022). It is worth 15% of the course assessment.

Tutorial Registration

ANU utilises MyTimetable to enable students to view the timetable for their enrolled courses, browse, then self-allocate to small teaching activities / tutorials so they can better plan their time. Find out more on the Timetable webpage.

Assessment Summary

Assessment task Value Due Date Return of assessment Learning Outcomes
Reading assignment 5 % 26/08/2022 02/09/2022 2,3,4,5
Innovation module on-line quiz 10 % 09/09/2022 09/09/2022 2,3,4,5
Topic in innovation or entrepreneurship Part 1 10 % 07/10/2022 04/11/2022 1,3
Topic in innovation or entrepreneurship Part 2 10 % 21/10/2022 04/11/2022 1,3
Topic in innovation or entrepreneurship Part 3 10 % 21/10/2022 04/11/2022 1,3
Case analysis 15 % 28/10/2022 11/11/2022 2,3,4,5
Final examination 40 % * 01/12/2022 1,2,5,6

* If the Due Date and Return of Assessment date are blank, see the Assessment Tab for specific Assessment Task details

Policies

ANU has educational policies, procedures and guidelines, which are designed to ensure that staff and students are aware of the University’s academic standards, and implement them. Students are expected to have read the Academic Misconduct Rule before the commencement of their course. Other key policies and guidelines include:

Assessment Requirements

The ANU is using Turnitin to enhance student citation and referencing techniques, and to assess assignment submissions as a component of the University's approach to managing Academic Integrity. For additional information regarding Turnitin please visit the ANU Online website Students may choose not to submit assessment items through Turnitin. In this instance you will be required to submit, alongside the assessment item itself, hard copies of all references included in the assessment item.

Moderation of Assessment

Marks that are allocated during Semester are to be considered provisional until formalised by the College examiners meeting at the end of each Semester. If appropriate, some moderation of marks might be applied prior to final results being released.

Participation

The are no specific participation requirements; however attendance at seminars is expected as this is an in-person, on-campus course. An on-line discussion group will be provided for students who are not able to attend the on-campus class.

Examination(s)

There is a formal examination - see Assessment task 7.

Additional examination information will be available on https://exams.anu.edu.au/timetable/  

The ANU Examinations Office will communicate all exam details directly to students.

Assessment Task 1

Value: 5 %
Due Date: 26/08/2022
Return of Assessment: 02/09/2022
Learning Outcomes: 2,3,4,5

Reading assignment

Assignment on the weekly readings for the innovation module (5%)

Two questions about one of the pre- or recommended readings in weeks 1 to 5

Answers up to a total of 400 words (approximately 200 words per question)

Assignment open for four days in week 5 following classes for that week.

Marking criteria for the pre-reading assignments will be available on the Wattle course site by the Monday of week 4.


Submit on the Wattle course site for via Turnitin.

Late submissions are not accepted. If you are unable to submit on time you should apply for an extension.

Due: week 5 following classes for that week.

Return of Assessment: one week after submission.

Assessment Task 2

Value: 10 %
Due Date: 09/09/2022
Return of Assessment: 09/09/2022
Learning Outcomes: 2,3,4,5

Innovation module on-line quiz

Innovation module Online Quiz (10%)

This quiz will be conducted online via Wattle. Almost all questions require a true/false answer; there will also be a small number of multiple choice questions. The duration of the quiz is one hour. It will be open for two hours on a day during the first week of the mid-semester break that is discussed with students in weeks 1 and 2.  

As most questions require a true/false answer about 50% of the questions could be answered correctly simply by guessing. Consequently 80% of the questions must be answered correctly to demonstrate a satisfactory level of understanding and so obtain a pass grade. Marks will be awarded in the following way: mark = 0.25x(% of correct answers - 60) rounded up to the nearest half-mark. So, for example, 60% or less correct = 0 marks; 80% correct = 5/10; 90% correct = 7.5/10, which will be rounded to 8/10.

DUE: by Friday 09 September 2022

Return of quiz scores: scores are provided immediately after completion.

Assessment Task 3

Value: 10 %
Due Date: 07/10/2022
Return of Assessment: 04/11/2022
Learning Outcomes: 1,3

Topic in innovation or entrepreneurship Part 1

Topic in innovation or entrepreneurship Part 1 (10%)

Analysis and synthesis of an important debate in the field of entrepreneurship and innovation, based on a critical review of the quality and relevance of research evidence.

The topics, detailed instructions and marking criteria for this assessment task will be available on the Wattle course site by the Monday of week 4.

Part one is an annotated bibliography in which you summarise your search for, and evaluation of, evidence about your chosen topic. 

Raw scores for this assessment task will be transformed into marks corresponding to ANU grade levels using a criterion-referenced standard setting procedure.

The resulting marks will be calibrated as follows:

  • Unsatisfactory quality: 0 to 5 marks
  • Satisfactory quality: 5 to 6 marks
  • Good quality: 6 to 7 marks
  • Superior quality: 7 to 8 marks
  • Exceptional quality: 8 to 10 marks


Submit on the Wattle course site for via Turnitin.

Late submissions are not accepted. If you are unable to submit on time you should apply for an extension.

DUE: the end of week 9 (23:59, Friday, 7 October 2022)

Return of Assessment: five weeks after submission.

Assessment Task 4

Value: 10 %
Due Date: 21/10/2022
Return of Assessment: 04/11/2022
Learning Outcomes: 1,3

Topic in innovation or entrepreneurship Part 2

Topic in innovation or entrepreneurship Part 2 (10%)

Analysis and synthesis of an important debate in the field of entrepreneurship and innovation, based on a critical review of the quality and relevance of research evidence.

The topics, detailed instructions and marking criteria for this assessment task will be available on the Wattle course site by the Monday of week 4.

Part two is a poster (approximately 700 words) in which you communicate your synthesis of what’s known about your chosen topic. The poster will be presented in-class during week 11.

Raw scores for this assessment task will be transformed into marks corresponding to ANU grade levels using a criterion-referenced standard setting procedure.

The resulting marks will be calibrated as follows:

Unsatisfactory quality: 0 to 5 marks

Satisfactory quality: 5 to 6 marks

Good quality: 6 to 7 marks

Superior quality: 7 to 8 marks

Exceptional quality: 8 to 10 marks


Submit (1) in-class during week 11 and (2) on the Wattle course site for via Turnitin before class in week 11..

Late submissions are not accepted. If you are unable to submit on time you should apply for an extension.

DUE: week 11

Return of Assessment: three weeks after submission.

Assessment Task 5

Value: 10 %
Due Date: 21/10/2022
Return of Assessment: 04/11/2022
Learning Outcomes: 1,3

Topic in innovation or entrepreneurship Part 3

Topic in innovation or entrepreneurship Part 3 (10%)

Analysis and synthesis of an important debate in the field of entrepreneurship and innovation, based on a critical review of the quality and relevance of research evidence.

The topics, detailed instructions and marking criteria for this assessment task will be available on the Wattle course site by the Monday of week 4.

Part three is a 5 minute podcast in which you communicate your synthesis of what’s known about your chosen topic for an audience of practitioners.

Raw scores for this assessment task will be transformed into marks corresponding to ANU grade levels using a criterion-referenced standard setting procedure.

The resulting marks will be calibrated as follows:

Unsatisfactory quality: 0 to 5 marks

Satisfactory quality: 5 to 6 marks

Good quality: 6 to 7 marks

Superior quality: 7 to 8 marks

Exceptional quality: 8 to 10 marks


Submit: on the Wattle course site for via Turnitin.

Late submissions are not accepted. If you are unable to submit on time you should apply for an extension.

DUE: the end of week 11 (23:59, Friday, 21 October 2022)

Return of Assessment: three weeks after submission.

Assessment Task 6

Value: 15 %
Due Date: 28/10/2022
Return of Assessment: 11/11/2022
Learning Outcomes: 2,3,4,5

Case analysis

Case analysis (15%)

Applying the concepts from this course to the analysis of a case study.

Opens on Monday in week 11; due end of week 12 (Friday 28 October 2022)

Information on format etc., together with marking criteria will be available on the Wattle course site by the Monday of week 11.


Submit on the Wattle course site for via Turnitin.

Late submissions are not accepted. If you are unable to submit on time you should apply for an extension.

Due: end of week 12 (23:59 Friday 28 October 2022)

Return of Assessment: two weeks after submission.

Assessment Task 7

Value: 40 %
Return of Assessment: 01/12/2022
Learning Outcomes: 1,2,5,6

Final examination

Final Examination (40%) – End of Semester examination period

There is a final examination for this course held during the end of semester examination period. The exam will be run remotely via Zoom. Students will have 3 hours to complete the exam.

The ANU Examinations Office will communicate all exam details directly to students.

The Exam will contain a combination of concept-related short answer questions, case study-based application questions, and reflective questions based on learning acquired from the course. The exam will be open book, with students being able to access their notes, readings, and slides from the course.


 The raw scores from the final examination will be transformed into marks corresponding to ANU grade levels using a criterion-referenced standard setting procedure.

The resulting marks will be calibrated as follows:

• Unsatisfactory quality: 0 to 19.9 marks

• Satisfactory quality: 20 to 23.9 marks

• Good quality: 24 to 27.9 marks

• Superior quality: 28.0 to 31.9 marks

• Exceptional quality: 32 to 40 marks


 DUE: End of Semester Examination Period which begins on 3 November 2022

Return of Assessment: after release of final grades on 1 December 2022

Academic Integrity

Academic integrity is a core part of our culture as a community of scholars. At its heart, academic integrity is about behaving ethically. This means that all members of the community commit to honest and responsible scholarly practice and to upholding these values with respect and fairness. The Australian National University commits to embedding the values of academic integrity in our teaching and learning. We ensure that all members of our community understand how to engage in academic work in ways that are consistent with, and actively support academic integrity. The ANU expects staff and students to uphold high standards of academic integrity and act ethically and honestly, to ensure the quality and value of the qualification that you will graduate with. The University has policies and procedures in place to promote academic integrity and manage academic misconduct. Visit the following Academic honesty & plagiarism website for more information about academic integrity and what the ANU considers academic misconduct. The ANU offers a number of services to assist students with their assignments, examinations, and other learning activities. The Academic Skills and Learning Centre offers a number of workshops and seminars that you may find useful for your studies.

Online Submission

The ANU uses Turnitin to enhance student citation and referencing techniques, and to assess assignment submissions as a component of the University's approach to managing Academic Integrity. While the use of Turnitin is not mandatory, the ANU highly recommends Turnitin is used by both teaching staff and students. For additional information regarding Turnitin please visit the ANU Online website.

Hardcopy Submission

For some forms of assessment (hand written assignments, art works, laboratory notes, etc.) hard copy submission is appropriate when approved by the Associate Dean (Education). Hard copy submissions must utilise the Assignment Cover Sheet. Please keep a copy of tasks completed for your records.

Late Submission

No submission of assessment tasks after the due date will be permitted without an extension. If an assessment task is not submitted by the due date, a mark of 0 will be awarded.


All requests for extensions to assessment in RSM courses must be submitted to the RSM School Office with a completed application form and supporting documentation. The RSM Extension Application Form and further information on this process can be found at https://www.rsm.anu.edu.au/education/education-programs/notices-for-students/extension-application-procedure/

Referencing Requirements

Accepted academic practice for referencing sources that you use in presentations can be found via the links on the Wattle site, under the file named “ANU and College Policies, Program Information, Student Support Services and Assessment”. Alternatively, you can seek help through the Students Learning Development website.

Returning Assignments

See the descriptions of assessment tasks.

Extensions and Penalties

Extensions and late submission of assessment pieces are covered by the Student Assessment (Coursework) Policy and Procedure The Course Convener may grant extensions for assessment pieces that are not examinations or take-home examinations. If you need an extension, you must request an extension in writing on or before the due date. If you have documented and appropriate medical evidence that demonstrates you were not able to request an extension on or before the due date, you may be able to request it after the due date.

Resubmission of Assignments

Unless specified otherwise in the assignment requirements, resubmissions are permitted up until the due date and time, but not allowed afterwards.

Privacy Notice

The ANU has made a number of third party, online, databases available for students to use. Use of each online database is conditional on student end users first agreeing to the database licensor’s terms of service and/or privacy policy. Students should read these carefully. In some cases student end users will be required to register an account with the database licensor and submit personal information, including their: first name; last name; ANU email address; and other information. In cases where student end users are asked to submit ‘content’ to a database, such as an assignment or short answers, the database licensor may only use the student’s ‘content’ in accordance with the terms of service — including any (copyright) licence the student grants to the database licensor. Any personal information or content a student submits may be stored by the licensor, potentially offshore, and will be used to process the database service in accordance with the licensors terms of service and/or privacy policy. If any student chooses not to agree to the database licensor’s terms of service or privacy policy, the student will not be able to access and use the database. In these circumstances students should contact their lecturer to enquire about alternative arrangements that are available.

Distribution of grades policy

Academic Quality Assurance Committee monitors the performance of students, including attrition, further study and employment rates and grade distribution, and College reports on quality assurance processes for assessment activities, including alignment with national and international disciplinary and interdisciplinary standards, as well as qualification type learning outcomes. Since first semester 1994, ANU uses a grading scale for all courses. This grading scale is used by all academic areas of the University.

Support for students

The University offers students support through several different services. You may contact the services listed below directly or seek advice from your Course Convener, Student Administrators, or your College and Course representatives (if applicable).
Dr Ian Elsum
0261257276
Ian.Elsum@anu.edu.au

Research Interests


Management of major/radical innovation. Open innovation networks. Commercialisation of major inventions. Strategy formation in new ventures.

Dr Ian Elsum

Thursday 14:00 16:00
Thursday 14:00 16:00
By Appointment
Anton Pemmer
0417236409
anton.pemmer@anu.edu.au

Research Interests


Anton Pemmer

Monday 16:00 18:00
Tuesday 16:00 18:00
Dr Ian Elsum
0261257276
Ian.Elsum@anu.edu.au

Research Interests


Dr Ian Elsum

Thursday 14:00 16:00
Thursday 14:00 16:00
By Appointment

Responsible Officer: Registrar, Student Administration / Page Contact: Website Administrator / Frequently Asked Questions