• Offered by International and Development Economics Program
  • ANU College ANU College of Asia and the Pacific
  • Classification Advanced
    Specialist
  • Course subject International and Developmental Economics
  • Areas of interest Economics
  • Academic career PGRD
  • Mode of delivery In Person
  • Offered in Second Semester 2014
    See Future Offerings

The course begins with an introduction to the functions of money, the demand for money, the creation and control of the money supply, and the creation of credit.  This leads to an understanding of the functions of interest rates and to the concept of optimal rates of inflation.  The course then provides the tools to understand the operation of the real macro economy and the operation of monetary policy. The course also describes how central banks are structured and what their mandates are.  This leads to a discussion about the operation of monetary policy in practice.  We  consider whether inflation targeting is welfare-maximizing policy in theory and practice and how the world appeared to achieve consensus on monetary policy  in the 1990s.  The course addresses what fundamental features of banking and financial markets  make them vulnerable to panics and crises and how financial regulation can be structured to redress some of the risks.  The course is intended for students in Graduate Diploma and Masters in International Economics and Development and also for Masters in Public Policy.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

This course gives the student an understanding

  1. of the functions and operation of banking institutions and financial markets,
  2. of the money supply and demand process and the role of banks in the creation of money,
  3. of the operation of monetary policy in the contemporary economy, 
  4. of the impact on banks’ balance sheets of different monetary and regulatory policy actions,
  5. of the relationship between monetary aggregates and the real economy,
  6. of how the effects of monetary policy are transmitted to the real economy,
  7. of the range and importance of the mandates for central banks and their methods of operation in several countries of Asia,
  8. of the sources of market failure in finance and the role of regulation in managing financial crises.

Students will also learn how to search for, and interpret, data relevant to the operation of monetary policy in the countries of Asia and the major economies of the world and will develop some understanding of how to evaluate monetary policy actions.

Indicative Assessment

Exam (mixed multiple choice, short and medium length written answers)

2 hour

By examinations office

Week 6

35%

Written assignment

Three questions, approx. 2000 words

Take home, one week exercise.  Paper submission to assignment box in Crawford

TBA, after end of course

50%

Submission of weekly written assignments

Varies

In tutorials

Throughout the course

5%

Group exercise

15 – 20 minute presentation

In class

Week 5

10%

The ANU uses Turnitin to enhance student citation and referencing techniques, and to assess assignment submissions as a component of the University's approach to managing Academic Integrity. While the use of Turnitin is not mandatory, the ANU highly recommends Turnitin is used by both teaching staff and students. For additional information regarding Turnitin please visit the ANU Online website.

Workload

30 contact hours (6 days @ 5 hours)

Prescribed Texts

Frederic Mishkin, The Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Markets, Addison-Wesley, 9th edition

Preliminary Reading

Frederic Mishkin, The Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Markets, Addison-Wesley, 9th edition, chapter 1

WEEK 1 

F Mishkin,  The Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Markets, 9th  edition, Pearson,  chapters 3, 14, 19

or

F Mishkin,  The Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Markets, 8th edition, Pearson,  chapters 3, 13, 14, 19

Miles and Scott, Macroeconomics: Understanding the Wealth of Nations, 2nd edition pp 273-277 (Chapter 11)

F Mishkin,  The Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Markets, 8th edition or 9th edition,  Pearson,  chapter 1,

D Miles and A Scott, Macroeconomics, Understanding the Wealth of Nations, 2nd ed, Wiley, chapter 11 pp 284-287

McCandless and Weber, 1995, Some Monetary Facts, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis Quarterly Review, vol 19, # 3

F Mishkin,  The Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Markets, 8th edition or 9th edition, Pearson,  chapter 24

Miles and Scott,  Chap 11 pp 257 – 270, pp 277 –

 

WEEK 2

F Mishkin,  The Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Markets, 8th or 9th edition, Pearson,  chapters (background 20,21,22), 23

Miles and Scott, Chapter 15 pp 398 – 401 and Chapter 12 pp 377 - 384

 

WEEK 3

F Mishkin,  The Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Markets, 8th edition, Pearson,  review chapter 14, chapters  15 & 16 (please also read chapter 13 of 9th ed)

Or

F Mishkin,  The Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Markets, 9th edition, Pearson,  review chapter 14, chapters 13, 15 & 16 pp 395 – 399 and pp 418 – 419.

 

F Mishkin,  The Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Markets, 8th edition, Pearson,  Chapter 16, pp 402 – 411

Or

F Mishkin,  The Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Markets, 9th edition, Pearson,  Chapter 16, pp 399 - 412

 

Goodfriend, M., “How the World Achieved Consensus on Monetary Policy,” in the Journal of Economic Perspectives, 2007.

 

F Mishkin,  The Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Markets, 8th  or 9th edition, Pearson,  chapters 25

Cukierman, A (2007): Central Bank Independence and Monetary Policymaking Institutions - Past Present and Future http://www.cepr.org/pubs/new-dps/dplist.asp?dpno=6441.asp

C Crowe and E Meade, 2007,  The Evolution of Central Bank Governance around the World,  Journal of Economic Perspectives, Vol 21, no 4.

 

WEEK 4

F Mishkin,  The Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Markets, 8th or 9th edition, Pearson,  chapters 8 and 11.

F Mishkin,  The Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Markets, 9th edition, Pearson, chapter 9 and 11 and Chap 16 pp 415 – 426 (this is not included in 8th edition so you need to read the 9th)

M Brunnermeier, 2008,  “Deciphering the 2007 – 08 Liquidity and Credit Crunch”, Journal of Economic Perspectives, 2008

H S Shin, 2008, “Reflections on Modern Bank Runs: A Case Study of Northern Rock”, Journal of Economic Perspectives, 2008.

Jean-Charles Rochet,  2008, Why are there so many Banking Crises? The Politics and Policy of Bank Regulation, Introduction and Chapter 1.

 

WEEK 5 – 6

F Mishkin,  The Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Markets, 9th edition, Pearson, chapter 9 and 11 and Chap 16 pp 415 – 426 (not included in 8th edition)

M Brunnermeier, 2008,  “Deciphering the 2007 – 08 Liquidity and Credit Crunch”, Journal of Economic Perspectives, 2008

H S Shin, 2008, “Reflections on Modern Bank Runs: A Case Study of Northern Rock”, Journal of Economic Perspectives, 2008.

Jean-Charles Rochet,  2008, Why are there so many Banking Crises? The Politics and Policy of Bank Regulation, Introduction and Chapter 1. 

Fees

Tuition fees are for the academic year indicated at the top of the page.  

If you are a domestic graduate coursework or international student you will be required to pay tuition fees. Students continuing in their current program of study will have their tuition fees indexed annually from the year in which you commenced your program. Further information for domestic and international students about tuition and other fees can be found at Fees.

Student Contribution Band:
2
Unit value:
6 units

If you are an undergraduate student and have been offered a Commonwealth supported place, your fees are set by the Australian Government for each course. At ANU 1 EFTSL is 48 units (normally 8 x 6-unit courses). You can find your student contribution amount for each course at Fees.  Where there is a unit range displayed for this course, not all unit options below may be available.

Units EFTSL
6.00 0.12500
Domestic fee paying students
Year Fee Description
1994-2003 $1680
2014 $3582
2013 $3582
2012 $3582
2011 $3576
2010 $3570
2009 $3570
2008 $3402
2007 $3132
2006 $3084
2005 $2988
2004 $2412
International fee paying students
Year Fee
1994-2003 $3606
2014 $4146
2013 $4140
2012 $4140
2011 $4134
2010 $4134
2009 $4002
2008 $4002
2007 $3864
2006 $3864
2005 $3864
2004 $3864
Note: Please note that fee information is for current year only.

Offerings, Dates and Class Summary Links

The list of offerings for future years is indicative only.
Class summaries, if available, can be accessed by clicking on the View link for the relevant class number.

Second Semester

Class number Class start date Last day to enrol Census date Class end date Mode Of Delivery Class Summary
9249 21 Jul 2014 08 Aug 2014 31 Aug 2014 30 Oct 2014 In Person N/A

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