• Offered by Law School
  • ANU College ANU College of Law
  • Course subject Laws
  • Areas of interest Law
  • Academic career UGRD
  • Course convener
    • Kevin Boreham
  • Mode of delivery In Person
  • Offered in First Semester 2014
    See Future Offerings

This course aims to provide students with a critical understanding of international human rights law and practice. Topics to be covered include:

 

 

  • historical development of international human rights law;
  • international humanitarian law (the law of armed conflict) and its relationship with the international law of human rights;
  • human rights ‘enforcement' mechanisms: the UN Human Rights Council, the human rights treaty bodies and human rights regional mechanisms;
  • the rights of women and the rights of indigenous peoples;
  • threats to rights, particularly counter terrorism measures;
  • application of international human rights law in Australia, including refugee issues; and
  • the future development of rights, including collective rights and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBT) rights.

     

     

     

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

At the conclusion of this course students should be able to:
  • critically analyse the norms of the international law of human rights and the mechanisms for their implementation
  • advocate effectively the progressive development of the international law of human rights
  • argue the case for observance of particular human rights norms.

Other Information

Students may find it helpful to take the course Human Rights Law in Australia LAWS2220 as well at some point in their degree, as the two courses together provide a comprehensive introduction to the law on human rights.

Indicative Assessment

The components of the assessment will be: either a class presentation worth 40% or a research paper worth 40%; a class participation mark worth 10%; and a take-home exam worth 50% to be undertaken at the end of the semester. The relationship between the assessment and the learning outcomes for the course will be set out in the course outline. Details of the course means of assessment will be provided on Wattle by the first week of the semester.

The ANU uses Turnitin to enhance student citation and referencing techniques, and to assess assignment submissions as a component of the University's approach to managing Academic Integrity. While the use of Turnitin is not mandatory, the ANU highly recommends Turnitin is used by both teaching staff and students. For additional information regarding Turnitin please visit the ANU Online website.

Workload

There will be three contact hours per week, made up of one large group lecture and two smaller seminars.  The average workload for the course will be 10 hours per week.

Requisite and Incompatibility

To enrol in this course you must be studying a program which includes a Bachelor of Laws or the Juris Doctor program (7330). Students must have completed LAWS2250 International Law and to have completed or be completing five 1000 level LAWS courses.

Prescribed Texts

Adam McBeth, Justine Nolan and Simon Rice The International Law of Human Rights (Oxford University Press 2011)

Preliminary Reading

Students should read Lynn Hunt's Inventing Human Rights: A history  (2007) and Mary Ann Glendon's A World Made New: Eleanor Roosevelt and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights  (2001). There are copies of both books in the Law Library.

Students should also visit the website of the International Service for Human Rights (http://www.ishr.ch/) to familiarize themselves with current human rights issues’.

The course outline will provide a recommended reading list, including useful web sites.

Majors

Minors

Fees

Tuition fees are for the academic year indicated at the top of the page.  

If you are a domestic graduate coursework or international student you will be required to pay tuition fees. Students continuing in their current program of study will have their tuition fees indexed annually from the year in which you commenced your program. Further information for domestic and international students about tuition and other fees can be found at Fees.

Student Contribution Band:
3
Unit value:
6 units

If you are an undergraduate student and have been offered a Commonwealth supported place, your fees are set by the Australian Government for each course. At ANU 1 EFTSL is 48 units (normally 8 x 6-unit courses). You can find your student contribution amount for each course at Fees.  Where there is a unit range displayed for this course, not all unit options below may be available.

Units EFTSL
6.00 0.12500
Domestic fee paying students
Year Fee
1994-2003 $1626
2004 $1926
2005 $2298
2006 $2646
2007 $2670
2008 $2670
2009 $2670
2010 $2718
2011 $2778
2012 $2808
2013 $2808
2014 $2808
International fee paying students
Year Fee
1994-2003 $2916
2004 $2916
2005 $3234
2006 $3426
2007 $3426
2008 $3426
2009 $3426
2010 $3750
2011 $3756
2012 $3756
2013 $3756
2014 $3762
Note: Please note that fee information is for current year only.

Offerings, Dates and Class Summary Links

The list of offerings for future years is indicative only.
Class summaries, if available, can be accessed by clicking on the View link for the relevant class number.

First Semester

Class number Class start date Last day to enrol Census date Class end date Mode Of Delivery Class Summary
5017 17 Feb 2014 07 Mar 2014 31 Mar 2014 30 May 2014 In Person N/A

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