• Offered by School of Sociology
  • ANU College ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences
  • Course subject Criminology
  • Academic career Undergraduate
  • Course convener
    • Dr Gavin Smith
  • Mode of delivery In Person
  • Offered in First Semester 2015
    See Future Offerings

Controversies in Crime Control provides students with an introduction to the crime control field from a sociological vista.

This course examines the social functions of deviance and explores the various strategies of securitization - e.g. private security growth, criminalization of mundane behaviours and social groups, hardening crime control legislation, mass surveillance and incarceration, etc. - emerging in response to what commonly is perceived as the 'crime crisis'. We consider the key issues associated with the identification and management of social problems and contemplate how behavioural disobedience, as a moral resource, is purposefully exploited for political and commercial ends. Using a set of case studies (or crime control 'controversies') as evidence, students will address the following key questions:

  • How are social problems defined and policed?
  • To what degree is public understanding of crime culturally mediated and influenced by specific rhetorics?
  • Which groups and interests effectively dictate crime control policies and criminal justice system agendas?
  • What are the social consequences of intensifications in criminalization processes and securitization projects?


Overall, this course equips students with the appropriate knowledge, acuity and research skills to understand and engage the contemporary crime control landscape from a critically informed perspective.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Discern the political and economic interests influencing the crime control landscape.
  2. Critically evaluate the social impacts and resonances of contemporary crime control interventions.
  3. Analyse struggles between governing authorities and governed populations.
  4. Apply theoretical perspectives used by sociologists to explain in original ways crime control processes, specifically theories of risk, power, capitalization, spectacle and struggle.
  5. Undertake and assess research in the field of crime control, including the use of census data, attitudinal surveys, content analysis, participant observation and interviews.
  6. Evaluate complex ideas lucidly and critically, orally and in writing.

Indicative Assessment

One 1500 word 'Research Essay' (35%) [Learning Outcomes 1, 4, 5 & 6]

'Tutorial Presentation' (20%) [Learning Outcomes 2, 3 & 6]

One 2000 word 'Synthesis Examination' (45%) [Learning Outcomes 1 - 6]

The ANU uses Turnitin to enhance student citation and referencing techniques, and to assess assignment submissions as a component of the University's approach to managing Academic Integrity. While the use of Turnitin is not mandatory, the ANU highly recommends Turnitin is used by both teaching staff and students. For additional information regarding Turnitin please visit the ANU Online website.

Workload

The workload will be one 2-hour workshop (interactive lecture) and one 1-hour student-led tutorial per week (total of three contact hours per week) with the expectation of a further 7 non-contact hours per week of independent study.

This includes:

• Two 'Core Readings' on each topic to be completed weekly

• Periodic practical exercises in advance of tutorials

• 4000-words approximately in assessed written work

• A compulsory oral presentation

Requisite and Incompatibility

To enrol in this course you must have completed 12 units of 1000 level SOCY courses; or permission of the convenor You are not able to enrol in this course if you have previously completed SOCY3016.

Prescribed Texts

Readings will be listed on the course Wattle site.

Majors

Minors

Fees

Tuition fees are for the academic year indicated at the top of the page.  

If you are a domestic graduate coursework or international student you will be required to pay tuition fees. Tuition fees are indexed annually. Further information for domestic and international students about tuition and other fees can be found at Fees.

Student Contribution Band:
Band 1
Unit value:
6 units

If you are an undergraduate student and have been offered a Commonwealth supported place, your fees are set by the Australian Government for each course. At ANU 1 EFTSL is 48 units (normally 8 x 6-unit courses). You can find your student contribution amount for each course at Fees.  Where there is a unit range displayed for this course, not all unit options below may be available.

Units EFTSL
6.00 0.12500
Domestic fee paying students
Year Fee
2015 $2604
International fee paying students
Year Fee
2015 $3576
Note: Please note that fee information is for current year only.

Offerings and Dates

The list of offerings for future years is indicative only

First Semester

Class number Class start date Last day to enrol Census date Class end date Mode Of Delivery
3513 16 Feb 2015 06 Mar 2015 31 Mar 2015 29 May 2015 In Person

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