• Offered by School of Archaeology and Anthropology
  • ANU College ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences
  • Classification Transitional
  • Course subject Anthropology
  • Areas of interest Anthropology, Development Studies, Environmental Studies, Economic History, Asia-Pacific Studies
  • Academic career Postgraduate
  • Course convener
    • Dr Patrick Guinness
  • Mode of delivery Online or In Person
  • Co-taught Course ANTH2009
  • Offered in First Semester 2019
    See Future Offerings

This course examines mainstream and alternative concepts of development by focusing on development issues and case studies located in so-called Third World countries. It examines the historical background to development ideas and practices, and the cultural presuppositions and assumptions on which they are consequently based, as well as the ways in which they impact on different cultures throughout the world. Of particular interest will be alternative concepts of development, such as people-centred development, gender and development, equity in development, local knowledge and values, sustainable development, and participation and empowerment in development.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills to:
  1. Critically evaluate development programs and projects in terms of their social and cultural impact.
  2. Apply anthropological concepts and theories to an understanding of planned social change.
  3. Critically examine key ethnographic writing in terms of its theoretical and methodological approach. 
  4. Present and engage in group discussion about development.
  5. Devise strategies for successful development outcomes.
  6. Critically examine the interaction between government, non-government organisations and civil society in development.

Indicative Assessment

Tutorial participation (10%) [Learning Outcomes 4, 5]
2-4 (dependent on class size) in-class presentations, 10 minutes each (equally weighted, total 10%) [Learning Outcomes 3, 5]
On-line Forum posts, 1000 words (10%) [Learning Outcomes 1, 3, 5]
Essay 1, 2500 words (35%) [Learning Outcomes 1, 2, 3, 6]
Essay 2, 2500 words (35%) [Learning Outcomes 1, 2, 3, 6]
 

The ANU uses Turnitin to enhance student citation and referencing techniques, and to assess assignment submissions as a component of the University's approach to managing Academic Integrity. While the use of Turnitin is not mandatory, the ANU highly recommends Turnitin is used by both teaching staff and students. For additional information regarding Turnitin please visit the ANU Online website.

Workload

130 hours of total student learning time made up from:
a) 36 hours of contact over 12 weeks: 24 hours of lectures and 12 hours of tutorials.
b) 94 hours of independent student research, reading and writing.

Requisite and Incompatibility

You are not able to enrol in this course if you have previously completed ANTH2009.

Preliminary Reading

Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan 2005 Anthropology and Development: Understanding Contemporary Social Change. London: Zed Books
David Mosse 2013 The anthropology of international development Annual Review of Anthropology 42: 227-246
Emma Crewe and Richard Axelby 2013 Anthropology and Development

Fees

Tuition fees are for the academic year indicated at the top of the page.  

If you are a domestic graduate coursework or international student you will be required to pay tuition fees. Tuition fees are indexed annually. Further information for domestic and international students about tuition and other fees can be found at Fees.

Student Contribution Band:
Band 1
Unit value:
6 units

If you are an undergraduate student and have been offered a Commonwealth supported place, your fees are set by the Australian Government for each course. At ANU 1 EFTSL is 48 units (normally 8 x 6-unit courses). You can find your student contribution amount for each course at Fees.  Where there is a unit range displayed for this course, not all unit options below may be available.

Units EFTSL
6.00 0.12500
Note: Please note that fee information is for current year only.

Offerings and Dates

The list of offerings for future years is indicative only

First Semester

Class number Class start date Last day to enrol Census date Class end date Mode Of Delivery
2006 25 Feb 2019 04 Mar 2019 31 Mar 2019 31 May 2019 In Person
4310 25 Feb 2019 04 Mar 2019 31 Mar 2019 31 May 2019 Online

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