• Class Number 4575
  • Term Code 2930
  • Class Info
  • Unit Value 6 units
  • Mode of Delivery In Person
  • COURSE CONVENER
    • Prof Angela Woollacott
  • Class Dates
  • Class Start Date 25/02/2019
  • Class End Date 31/05/2019
  • Census Date 31/03/2019
  • Last Date to Enrol 04/03/2019
  • TUTOR
    • Rebecca Collard
SELT Survey Results

In the 1960s-1970s Australia fought the Vietnam War, enacted civil rights for Aborigines, ended the White Australia policy and curtailed discrimination including against women and homosexuals. Australians overcame 'cultural cringe', took to Australian films, literature and music, reached out to Asia and embraced multiculturalism. They also took to the streets to protest against the Vietnam War, uranium mining and the nuclear threat, and Aboriginal oppression, while demanding legal abortions and gay rights. It was a time of ferment, and radical social and legal reform. Charismatic political leaders galvanised public attention and raised the level of debate. Censorship was challenged, rock music was everywhere, and sex seemed to be too. This course will take a wide view of Australian politics, involvement in and withdrawal from the Vietnam War, and social change. It will consider why these were such decades of change and what we can learn about processes of change and reform, using texts, photographs, music and films from the period. 

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills to:
  1. Identify the major political, legal and social changes in Australia in the 1960s and 70s;
  2. Analyse and discuss Australia's participation in and withdrawal from the Vietnam war;
  3. Formulate arguments about the connections between political change and social change, orally and in writing;
  4. Reflect on and explain causes and consequences of legal and political reforms in the 1960s-70s; and,
  5. Analyse primary sources as historical evidence and use them to discuss secondary sources critically.

Examination Material or equipment

Students will be permitted to take any materials other than ANU library books into the examination room.

Recommended book available at Harry Hartog Bookshop

Donald Horne, The Lucky Country

Books on reserve at Chifley Library

I have asked the Library to place the following on 2-hour Reserve:

Donald Horne, The Lucky Country

Geoffrey Bolton, Oxford History of Australia Vol. 5

Staff Feedback

Students will be given feedback in the following forms in this course:

  • written comments on essays
  • group feedback during tutorial discussions
  • possibly in lecture if relevant.

Student Feedback

ANU is committed to the demonstration of educational excellence and regularly seeks feedback from students. Students are encouraged to offer feedback directly to their Course Convener or through their College and Course representatives (if applicable). The feedback given in these surveys is anonymous and provides the Colleges, University Education Committee and Academic Board with opportunities to recognise excellent teaching, and opportunities for improvement. The Surveys and Evaluation website provides more information on student surveys at ANU and reports on the feedback provided on ANU courses.

Other Information

Referencing requirements

All essays must have footnotes. A guide to referencing is available on the School of History website: http://history.cass.anu.edu.au/sites/default/files/History%20Essay%20Reference%20Guide%202016.pdf


READING LIST

Please see the course Wattle site for Required Tutorial readings each week and for updates to the readings list below.


Recommended readings on possible essay topics


General Australian history 1960s-70s

Geoffrey Bolton, The Oxford History of Australia Vol. 5 The Middle Way 1942-1995

Ann Curthoys, AW Martin and Tim Rowse (eds.), Australians From 1939

Donald Horne, On How I Came to Write ‘The Lucky Country’

Donald Horne, Time of Hope: Australia 1966-72

Tanja Luckins, Go! Melbourne in the Sixties

Stuart Macintyre, A Concise History of Australia

Craig McGregor, People, Politics and Pop: Australians in the Sixties

Craig McGregor, Profile of Australia

Mark Peel and Christina Twomey, A History of Australia

Shirleene Robinson and Julie Ustinoff (eds.), The 1960s in Australia: People, Power and Politics

 

Political history

Judith Brett, Australian Liberals and the Moral Middle Class from Alfred Deakin to John Howard

Troy Bramston (ed.), The Whitlam Legacy

Colleen Lewis and Jenny Hocking, eds., It’s Time Again: Whitlam and Modern Labor

Jenny Hocking, Gough Whitlam: The Biography

Jenny Hocking, His Time: Gough Whitlam Vol. 2

Paul Kelly and Troy Bramston, The Dismissal in the Queen’s Name

Frank Walker, Maralinga: The chilling expose of our secret nuclear shame and betrayal of our troops and country


Aboriginal rights

Bain Attwood, Rights for Aborigines

Bain Attwood and Andrew Markus, eds., The Struggle for Aboriginal Rights: A Documentary History

Bain Attwood and Andrew Markus, The 1967 Referendum

Richard Broome, Aboriginal Australians: Black Responses to White Dominance, 1788-2001

Richard Broome, Aboriginal Victorians: A History Since 1800

Ann Curthoys, Freedom Ride: A Freedom Rider Remembers

Russell McGregor, ‘Another Nation: Aboriginal Activism in the Late 1960s and Early 1970s’, Australian Historical Studies Vol 40 Issue 3 Sept 2009: 343-360

Tim Rowse ed., Contesting Assimilation.


Gender and sexuality

Australian Feminist Studies 2016 special issue on Germaine Greer.

Frank Bongiorno, The Sex Lives of Australians: A History

Barbara Caine and Moira Gatens, Australian Feminism: A Companion;

Ann Curthoys, For and Against Feminism: A Personal Journey into Feminist Theory and History;

Germaine Greer, The Female Eunuch

Norma Grieve and Ailsa Burns (eds.), Australian Women: Contemporary Feminist Thought

Norma Grieve and Ailsa Burns (eds.), Australian Women: New Feminist Perspectives

Freedom Bound II: Documents on Women in Modern Australia, eds. Katie Holmes and Marilyn Lake.

Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique

Gisela Kaplan, The Meagre Harvest: The Australian Women’s Movement, 1950s-1990s

Marilyn Lake, Getting Equal: A History of Feminism in Australia

Tanja Luckins, ‘Domesticating cosmopolitanism: Charmian Clift’s women’s column in the Sydney Morning Herald and Melbourne Herald in the 1960s’, History Australia Vol. 11 No. 3 (Dec. 2014): 97-115.

Aileen Moreton-Robinson, Talkin’ Up to the White Woman: Aboriginal Women and Feminism;

Pat O’Shane, ‘Is There Any Relevance in the Women’s Movement for Aboriginal Women?’, Refractory Girl, no. 12 (1976), pp. 31-34.

Marian Sawer and Gail Radford, Making Women Count: A History of the Women’s Electoral Lobby in Australia;

Marian Sawer and Marian Simms, A Woman’s Place: Women and Politics in Australia.

Garry Wotherspoon, Gay Perspectives: Essays in Australian Gay Culture

 

Ending White Australia and multiculturalism

Peter Edwards, Facing North: A Century of Australian Engagement with Asia

David Walker and Agnieszka Sobocinska (eds.), Australia’s Asia: From Yellow Peril to Asian Century

Agnieszka Sobocinska, Visiting the Neighbours: Australians in Asia

Gwenda Tavan, Long, Slow Death of White Australia

Shen Yuanfang, Dragon Seed in the Antipodes: Chinese-Australian Autobiographies.

Janis Wilton and Richard Bosworth, Old Worlds and New Australia: The Post-War Migrant Experience.


Vietnam War

Jeannine Baker, Australian Women War Reporters: Boer War to Vietnam

Ann Curthoys, ‘”Vietnam”: Public Memory of an Anti-War Movement’, Ch 6 in Kate Darian-Smith and Paula Hamilton (eds.), Memory & History in 20th Century Australia

Joy Damousi and Marilyn Lake (eds.), Gender and War : Australians At War in the 20th Century

Peter Edwards, A Nation at War: Australian politics, society and diplomacy during the Vietnam War 1965-75

Robin Gerster, ‘A bit of the other: Touring Vietnam’, from Joy Damousi and Marilyn Lake (eds.), Gender and War: Australians at War in the Twentieth Century

Ian Mackay, Australians in Vietnam

Siobhan McHugh, Minefields and Miniskirts: Australian Women and the Vietnam War

John Murphy, Harvest of Fear: A History of Australia’s Vietnam War;

Gregory Pemberton, All the Way: Australia’s Road to Vietnam.

Gregory Pemberton (ed.), Vietnam Remembered

Marilyn B. Young, The Vietnam Wars: 1945-1990


Protest movements

Lorna Arnold and Mark Smith, Britain, Australia and the Bomb: The Nuclear Tests and Their Aftermath

Sean Brawley, ‘”Days of Rage” Downunder: Considering American Influence on “Home-Grown” Terrorism and ASIO’s response in 1970s Australia’, Australian Historical Studies Vol. 47 Issue 2 (2016): 295-310.

Kate Murphy, ‘”In the Backblocks of Capitalism”: Australian Student Activism in the Global 1960s’, Australian Historical Studies Vol. 46, Issue 2 (June 2015): 252-68.

Suellen Murray, ‘”Make Pies Not War”: Protests by the Women’s Peace Movement of the Mid 1980s’, Australian Historical Studies No. 127 April 2006: 81-94.

Jon Piccini, Transnational Protest, Australia and the 1960s

 

Culture

Stephen Alomes, When London Calls: The Expatriation of Australian Creative Artists to Britain

Michelle Arrow, Friday on our Minds: Popular Culture in Australia since 1945

Michelle Arrow, Upstaged: Australian women dramatists in the limelight at last

Nicole Moore, The Censor’s Library: Uncovering the lost history of Australia’s Banned Books

Class Schedule

Week/Session Summary of Activities Assessment
1 Introduction and Organisation: Why the 1960s-70s? Tutorial: Introduction
2 Events and legacies of the 1950s Tutorial: Donald Horne, The Lucky Country (selected chapters as listed on Wattle); Judith Brett, ‘Menzies’ Forgotten People’.
3 Australia in the 1960s-70s: economy and demographics Tutorial: Donald Horne, The Lucky Country (selected chapters as listed on Wattle); Fiona Allon, ‘At Home in the Suburbs’, History Australia Vol. 11, 2014
4 The Lucky Country? Tutorial: Donald Horne, The Lucky Country (selected chapters as listed on Wattle); ABC Radio National Hindsight program, ‘The Lucky Country 50 Years on.’
5 Australia and the Vietnam War Tutorial: Christina Twomey, ‘The National Service Scheme: Citizenship and the Tradition of Compulsory Military Service in 1960s Australia’; Robin Gerster, ‘A Bit of the Other: Touring Vietnam’ from Damousi and Lake (eds.), Gender and War.
6 The Moratorium movement and other protests Tutorial: Ann Curthoys, ‘Mobilising Dissent: The Later Stages of Protest’; Peter Cochrane, ‘At War at Home: Australian Attitudes During the Vietnam Years’
7 Ending White Australia and embracing multiculturalism Tutorial: Donald Horne, The Lucky Country, preface and ch on Asia; Gwenda Tavan, ‘Long, Slow Death of White Australia’; Tanja Luckins, ‘Cosmopolitanism and the Cosmopolitans: Australia in the World
8 The Women’s Liberation Movement – Australian style Tutorial: Germaine Greer, The Female Eunuch 2 chapters; Marilyn Lake, Getting Equal, Ch 9
9 Censorship, sexuality and ending discrimination against homosexuals Tutorial: Nicole Moore, The Censor’s Library – chapter; Frank Bongiorno, The Sex Lives of Australians Ch 9
10 Politics and reform: The Dismissal and other events Tutorial: Troy Bramston (ed.), The Whitlam Legacy (2013) selected chapters as on Wattle.
11 Guest lecturer ? Aboriginal rights: the 1967 Referendum and land rights Tutorial: Ann Curthoys’s Diary of the 1965 Freedom Ride in NSW; Bain Attwood and Andrew Markus, The 1967 Referendum esp Preface, Chs 1, 6, 7 and 8
12 Guest lecturer? Music, film, theatre and popular culture Tutorial: Craig McGregor, Profile of Australia (1966) Ch on Popular Culture; Michelle Arrow, Friday On Our Minds: Popular Culture in Australia Since 1945 Ch 5 on the 1970s.

Tutorial Registration

Required

Assessment Summary

Assessment task Value Due Date Return of assessment Learning Outcomes
Primary source analysis short essay. 10 % 18/03/2019 01/04/2019 Identify the major political, legal and social changes in Australia in the 1960s and 1970s Analyse primary sources as historical evidence and use them to discuss secondary sources critically. Formulate arguments about the connections between political change and social change, orally and in writing. Reflect on and explain causes and consequences of legal and political reforms in the 1960s and 1970s.
Research Essay. 30 % 10/05/2019 31/05/2019 Identify the major political, legal and social changes in Australia in the 1960s and 1970s Analyse primary sources as historical evidence and use them to discuss secondary sources critically. Formulate arguments about the connections between political change and social change, orally and in writing. Reflect on and explain causes and consequences of legal and political reforms in the 1960s and 1970s.
Final Examination 50 % 06/06/2019 04/07/2019 as above Analyse and discuss Australia's participation in and withdrawal from the Vietnam War. as above as above
Participation 10 % 25/02/2019 31/05/2019 Analyse and discuss Australia's participation in and withdrawal from the Vietnam War. Formulate arguments about the connections between political change and social change, orally and in writing. Reflect on and explain causes and consequences of legal and political reforms in the 1960s-70s. Analyse primary sources as historical evidence and use them to discuss secondary sources critically.

Policies

ANU has educational policies, procedures and guidelines, which are designed to ensure that staff and students are aware of the University’s academic standards, and implement them. Students are expected to have read the Academic Misconduct Rule before the commencement of their course. Other key policies and guidelines include:

Assessment Requirements

The ANU is using Turnitin to enhance student citation and referencing techniques, and to assess assignment submissions as a component of the University's approach to managing Academic Integrity. For additional information regarding Turnitin please visit the ANU Online website. Students may choose not to submit assessment items through Turnitin. In this instance you will be required to submit, alongside the assessment item itself, hard copies of all references included in the assessment item.

Moderation of Assessment

Marks that are allocated during Semester are to be considered provisional until formalised by the College examiners meeting at the end of each Semester. If appropriate, some moderation of marks might be applied prior to final results being released.

Participation


Examination(s)


Assessment Task 1

Value: 10 %
Due Date: 18/03/2019
Return of Assessment: 01/04/2019
Learning Outcomes: Identify the major political, legal and social changes in Australia in the 1960s and 1970s Analyse primary sources as historical evidence and use them to discuss secondary sources critically. Formulate arguments about the connections between political change and social change, orally and in writing. Reflect on and explain causes and consequences of legal and political reforms in the 1960s and 1970s.

Primary source analysis short essay.

Students are required to locate 1-5 primary sources (such as newspapers and magazines, statistics e.g. from the ABS, unpublished texts including letters and diaries, objects, music, novels, poetry, photographs or film) pertinent to the course and from the period, and to analyse it or them in specific historical context.

In order to analyse your primary source(s), you may refer to secondary sources (published, analytical articles and books by historians and other scholars). The reading lists at the end of this Course Outline are a good start for your bibliographic research; the footnotes and bibliographies of secondary works are useful to identify possible primary sources.


Word limit: 1,000 words.

Assessment Task 2

Value: 30 %
Due Date: 10/05/2019
Return of Assessment: 31/05/2019
Learning Outcomes: Identify the major political, legal and social changes in Australia in the 1960s and 1970s Analyse primary sources as historical evidence and use them to discuss secondary sources critically. Formulate arguments about the connections between political change and social change, orally and in writing. Reflect on and explain causes and consequences of legal and political reforms in the 1960s and 1970s.

Research Essay.

This essay asks students to choose or define an appropriate research project pertinent to the course; to identify and locate relevant primary (at least 5) and secondary (at least 6) sources (see above for definitions); and to construct an argument in a well-written essay.

Please consult with either Angela or Rebecca early in the process of deciding your topic.


Word limit: 3,500 words

Assessment Task 3

Value: 50 %
Due Date: 06/06/2019
Return of Assessment: 04/07/2019
Learning Outcomes: as above Analyse and discuss Australia's participation in and withdrawal from the Vietnam War. as above as above

Final Examination

There will be a 2-hour final examination, which will cover all of the lectures and required readings. The exam will encourage students to synthesise the lectures and required reading material as a body of knowledge on Australia in the 1960s-70s, and to draw on that knowledge critically and analytically to respond to questions.

Assessment Task 4

Value: 10 %
Due Date: 25/02/2019
Return of Assessment: 31/05/2019
Learning Outcomes: Analyse and discuss Australia's participation in and withdrawal from the Vietnam War. Formulate arguments about the connections between political change and social change, orally and in writing. Reflect on and explain causes and consequences of legal and political reforms in the 1960s-70s. Analyse primary sources as historical evidence and use them to discuss secondary sources critically.

Participation

Students must sign up for and attend a weekly tutorial. It is expected that students will come to tutorial having read the required material, and prepared to discuss it in relation to the weekly theme. Participation will be assessed on the basis of evidence of having done the reading and relevance of contribution to discussion. Tutorial participation will nurture students’ ability to think critically about the required readings, and to engage each other in constructive discussion, while promoting their own ability to construct arguments orally.

Academic Integrity

Academic integrity is a core part of our culture as a community of scholars. At its heart, academic integrity is about behaving ethically. This means that all members of the community commit to honest and responsible scholarly practice and to upholding these values with respect and fairness. The Australian National University commits to embedding the values of academic integrity in our teaching and learning. We ensure that all members of our community understand how to engage in academic work in ways that are consistent with, and actively support academic integrity. The ANU expects staff and students to uphold high standards of academic integrity and act ethically and honestly, to ensure the quality and value of the qualification that you will graduate with. The University has policies and procedures in place to promote academic integrity and manage academic misconduct. Visit the following Academic honesty & plagiarism website for more information about academic integrity and what the ANU considers academic misconduct. The ANU offers a number of services to assist students with their assignments, examinations, and other learning activities. The Academic Skills and Learning Centre offers a number of workshops and seminars that you may find useful for your studies.

Online Submission

You will be required to electronically sign a declaration as part of the submission of your assignment. Please keep a copy of the assignment for your records. Unless an exemption has been approved by the Associate Dean (Education) as submission must be through Turnitin. It is advisable to submit your essay at least a little before the deadline.

Hardcopy Submission

Students in HIST2239 are also requested to submit their essays in hard copy using the Assignment Cover Sheet provided on Wattle. These can be submitted at the tutorial (or lecture) following the due date for the assignment. The Turnitin submission time and date will be used to calculate any lateness penalty. Please keep a copy of tasks completed for your records.

Late Submission

Late submission of assessment tasks without an approved extension are penalised at the rate of 5% of the possible marks available per working day or part thereof. Late submission of assessment tasks is not accepted after 10 working days after the due date, or on or after the date specified in the course outline for the return of the assessment item. Late submission is not accepted for take-home examinations.

Referencing Requirements

Accepted academic practice for referencing sources that you use in presentations can be found via the links on the Wattle site, under the file named “ANU and College Policies, Program Information, Student Support Services and Assessment”. Alternatively, you can seek help through the Students Learning Development website.

Returning Assignments

Essays will be returned to students in class.



Extensions and Penalties

Extensions and late submission of assessment pieces are covered by the Student Assessment (Coursework) Policy and Procedure. The Course Convener may grant extensions for assessment pieces that are not examinations or take-home examinations. If you need an extension, you must request an extension in writing on or before the due date. If you have documented and appropriate medical evidence that demonstrates you were not able to request an extension on or before the due date, you may be able to request it after the due date.

Resubmission of Assignments

Students may NOT resubmit any assignments.

Privacy Notice

The ANU has made a number of third party, online, databases available for students to use. Use of each online database is conditional on student end users first agreeing to the database licensor’s terms of service and/or privacy policy. Students should read these carefully. In some cases student end users will be required to register an account with the database licensor and submit personal information, including their: first name; last name; ANU email address; and other information.
In cases where student end users are asked to submit ‘content’ to a database, such as an assignment or short answers, the database licensor may only use the student’s ‘content’ in accordance with the terms of service – including any (copyright) licence the student grants to the database licensor. Any personal information or content a student submits may be stored by the licensor, potentially offshore, and will be used to process the database service in accordance with the licensors terms of service and/or privacy policy.
If any student chooses not to agree to the database licensor’s terms of service or privacy policy, the student will not be able to access and use the database. In these circumstances students should contact their lecturer to enquire about alternative arrangements that are available.

Distribution of grades policy

Academic Quality Assurance Committee monitors the performance of students, including attrition, further study and employment rates and grade distribution, and College reports on quality assurance processes for assessment activities, including alignment with national and international disciplinary and interdisciplinary standards, as well as qualification type learning outcomes.

Since first semester 1994, ANU uses a grading scale for all courses. This grading scale is used by all academic areas of the University.

Support for students

The University offers students support through several different services. You may contact the services listed below directly or seek advice from your Course Convener, Student Administrators, or your College and Course representatives (if applicable).

Prof Angela Woollacott
6125 2715
angela.woollacott@anu.edu.au

Research Interests


Australian and British Empire history; colonialism, race and gender; biography and transnational history

Prof Angela Woollacott

Wednesday 14:00 15:00
Rebecca Collard
rebecca.collard@anu.edu

Research Interests


Rebecca Collard

Wednesday 14:00 15:00

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