• Class Number 3092
  • Term Code 2930
  • Class Info
  • Unit Value 6 units
  • Mode of Delivery In Person
  • COURSE CONVENER
    • Dr Maria Emma Liwag
  • LECTURER
    • Dr Maria Emma Liwag
  • Class Dates
  • Class Start Date 25/02/2019
  • Class End Date 31/05/2019
  • Census Date 31/03/2019
  • Last Date to Enrol 04/03/2019
  • TUTOR
    • Catherine Deen
SELT Survey Results

 The overarching goal of this course is to help students develop a deeper understanding of theory and research in the area of career development and planning and to demonstrate how such knowledge is pertinent for the effective management of the students’ career prospects. The course operates under the assumption that an in-depth understanding of career issues will help students become a successful employee or leader and will assist with their long-term career goals and aspirations.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

  1. Better manage their own careers, in general,and prepare for the job search process, in particular;
  2. Conceptualise and implement projects working in teams;
  3. Articulate awareness and insights about their strengths and growth areas and develop practical strategies to apply these insights in managing their own career development;
  4. Determine a career path that best suits their values, interests, personality, and skills;
  5. Identify factors influencing employees and their careers;
  6. Compare and contrast the various theories of career choice and development; and,
  7. Articulate an in-depth understanding of theory and research in the area of career development.

Research-Led Teaching

The course content will be a blend of research and practice and will include the lecturer’s research in the area of career development. In addition, key concepts, cases and practical experiences will be presented in the lectures that are not covered in the course material. Lectures and tutorials will be supplemented with structured learning exercises and activities (e.g., role-playing, simulations) that have well-defined objectives and replicate the real-world context.

Field Trips

There will be no field trips for this course.

Additional Course Costs

There are no additional course costs for this course.

Examination Material or equipment

No extra material is allowed in the long quizzes for this course.


Required Resources

All required readings for the lecture and tutorials will be made available on Wattle.

Students will also be required to complete a series of assessment tools that will be the basis for the self-assessment portfolio and career report. Self-Assessment tools will be distributed/administered (in the case of a standardised ability test) in both lectures and tutorials. It is the students' responsibility to ensure that they have collected and completed all Self-Assessment tools. If students are away for any reason, they must follow up with the tutors upon their return.

No text and/or group of selected readings can encompass all of the relevant theory, research, and practitioner literature surrounding career planning, career entry, career management, and career development. Students are encouraged to investigate additional books in their exploration of this subject. The following books may be of interest:

Baruch, Y. (2004). Managing careers: Theory and practice. England: Pearson.

Bright, J., & Earl, J. (2004). Resumes that get short-listed. Australia: Allen.

Brown, D. (2007). Career information, career counseling, and career development (9th ed.). Boston: Pearson.

Feldman, D. (1988). Managing careers in organizations. Glenview, IL: Scott Foresman.

Greenhaus, J. H., Callanan, G. A., & Godshalk, V. M. (2010). Career management (4th ed.). LA: Sage.

Harrington, B. & Hall, D. (2007). Career management and work-life integration: Using self-assessment to navigate contemporary careers. LA: Sage.

Relevant Periodicals

Some topics in career planning are reasonably dynamic and the relevant material in books may date quite quickly. It is therefore important to read and explore around the prescribed text/readings and to monitor relevant periodicals (both practitioner as well as academic journals). I strongly recommend that you use the following journal resources for the integrative research summary (note that this is only a partial list of journals which publish research on career-related issues):

·       Academy of Management Journal

·       Academy of Management Learning and Education

·       Applied Psychology: An International Review

·       Australian Journal of Career Development

·       British Journal of Management

·       Canadian Journal of Career Development

·       Career Development International

·       Career Development Quarterly

·       Human Resource Management

·       Human Resource Management Journal

·       Journal of Applied Psychology

·       Journal of Applied Social Psychology

·       Journal of Business and Psychology

·       Journal of Career Assessment

·       Journal of Career Development

·       Journal of Management

·       Journal of Management Studies

·       Journal of Organizational Behavior

·       Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology

·       Journal of Vocational Behavior

·       Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes

·       Personnel Psychology

Staff Feedback

Students will be given feedback in the following forms in this course:

  • Written comments
  • Verbal comments
  • Feedback to the whole class, to presenting groups, and to individuals

Student Feedback

ANU is committed to the demonstration of educational excellence and regularly seeks feedback from students. Students are encouraged to offer feedback directly to their Course Convener or through their College and Course representatives (if applicable). The feedback given in these surveys is anonymous and provides the Colleges, University Education Committee and Academic Board with opportunities to recognise excellent teaching, and opportunities for improvement. The Surveys and Evaluation website provides more information on student surveys at ANU and reports on the feedback provided on ANU courses.

Class Schedule

Week/Session Summary of Activities Assessment
1 Week 1: Introduction & overview of the course; Orientation about course assessments Key issues to be addressed: What is career? How is it conceptualised? Who manages one's career? Structured Learning Activity 1: Expectation setting REMINDER: Complete the Holland's Vocational Choice Inventory. We will interpret this inventory in the next lecture.
2 Week 2: Theoretical underpinnings of career development Key issues to be addressed: What are the conceptual bases of career development? Structured Learning Activity 2: Work and need fulfillment REMINDER: Complete the Kiersey Temperament Sorter and the Big Five Inventory. We will score and interpret these personality tests in the next lecture. Tutorial Activities: Formation of groups for Empirical Research Presentation & Review Paper and development of individual and team psychological contracts Selection of topic and presentation week REMINDER: Complete Career Autobiography and Interview with Significant Others. We will discuss these career questionnaires in the next tutorial.
3 Week 3: Personality and abilities Key issues to be addressed: Why are personality traits and abilities relevant in career planning? Lecture Activity: Scoring and interpreting the Kiersey Temperament Sorter and the Big Five Inventory Tutorial Activity: Journey into self-awareness: Discussion of Career Autobiography and Interview with Significant Others
4 Week 4: Emotional intelligence Key issues to be addressed: What is emotional intelligence and why is it significant for career and personal development? Structured Learning Activity 3: EQ Quiz Tutorial Activity: Taking and scoring an EQ test
5 Week 5: A Model of Career Management: Goals, strategies and appraisals Key issues to be addressed: What are career goals? Why are career goals important in career decision-making? Structured Learning Activity 4: Career goal-setting and strategic planning Other Lecture Activities: Practical tips on how to ace multiple choice tests Practice test in preparation for Long Quiz next week. REMINDER: Bring all the completed and scored assessment tools in the next lecture in preparation for the workshop on the 'Anatomy of the Self-assessment Report'. Tutorial Activity: Simulation of a 50-minute timed mental ability test REMINDER: Complete the following: Ideal Job Description, Career Anchors, and Work Values Inventory. We will score and interpret these assessment instruments in the next tutorial.
6 Week 6: Workshop #1: The Anatomy of the Self-Assessment Report Key issues to be discussed in the workshop: How do we integrate the self-assessment results? How do we develop themes? What insights can we learn from the themes? ***LONG QUIZ 1 (30 minutes) ***ASSESSMENT DUE: Develop two themes for formative feedback; to be submitted at the end of the workshop (not graded) Tutorial Activities: Scoring and interpreting the mental ability test taken last week Discussion on the role of career interests in career-choice making and planning
7 Week 7: No lecture (ANZAC Day: Public holiday) Tutorial Activities: Group Presentation 1: Career success Group Presentation 2: Work/family balance Feedback will be given to the presenting groups after the tutorial. Advance assignment (Structured Learning Activity 5) to be given online in preparation for Workshop #2 next week (Resume Writing and Addressing Selection Criteria)
8 Week 8: Workshop #2: Resume Writing and Addressing Selection Criteria Key issues to be discussed in the workshop: How do we create impactful resumes? How do we bring out the best in ourselves? Structured Learning Activity 5: Addressing selection criteria Structured Learning Activity 6: Using the STAR Model Structured Learning Activity 7: Resume self-critique Tutorial Activities: Group Presentation 3: Psychological contracts Group Presentation 4: Abusive supervision Feedback will be given to the presenting groups after the tutorial.
9 Week 9: Recruitment and selection: Entry from the organization’s perspective Key issues to be addressed: How do organisations select employees? What recruitment and selection strategies are used? Structured Learning Activity 8: Simulating an Assessment Centre Tutorial Activities: Group Presentation 5: Coaching and feedback Role-playing of feedback/coaching session
10 Week 10: Developing a resilient career: Special topic - Power and politics in organizations Key issues to be addressed: What is power and how does this impact workplace dynamics? Do influence tactics enable us to get ahead at work? Structured Learning Activity 9: Mock quiz show on Workplace Politics ***ASSESSMENT DUE: Submit the hard copy of the Self-assessment report and portfolio (e.g., completed and scored assessment tools) to the RSM Office by COB today. An electronic version of the self-assessment report should also be submitted via Turnitin. Tutorial Activities: Group Presentation 6: Employment interviews Feedback will be given to the presenting group after the tutorial. Exercise in using behavioural and situational interviews in recruitment, selection and placement.
11 Week 11: Developing a resilient career: Special topic - Career adaptability Key issues to be addressed: What is career adaptability? What are the building blocks of career adaptability? Structured Learning Activity 10: ‘How Career Adaptable Am I?’ Tutorial Activities: Group Presentation 7: Politics in the workplace Feedback will be given to the presenting group after the tutorial. Exercise in workplace politics and negotiations
12 Week 12: Integration and individual career management consultation ***LONG QUIZ 2 (30 minutes) Lecture Activity: Individual career management consultation (disseminate self-assessment report with marks and feedback during the face-to-face session) Tutorial Activity: Individual career management consultation (disseminate self-assessment report with marks and feedback during the face-to-face session)

Tutorial Registration

Instructions on Wattle course site

Assessment Summary

Assessment task Value Due Date Return of assessment Learning Outcomes
Assessment 1: Theme Development (formative feedback, individual) 0 % 04/04/2019 11/04/2019 1,2,3,4
Assessment 2: Self-assessment Report & Portfolio (Individual) (35%) 35 % 16/05/2019 28/05/2019 1,2,3,4,5
Assessment 3: Empirical Research Presentation/Group Report (Group) (10%) 10 % 23/04/2019 30/04/2019 1,4,5,6
Assessment 4: Empirical Research Review Paper (Group) (20%) 20 % 30/04/2019 07/05/2019 1,4,5,6
Assessment 5: Structured Learning Activities (Individual and Group) (0.5% each x 10 activities = 5% total) 5 % 28/02/2019 31/05/2019 1,2,3,4,5,6
Assessment 6: Contribution and Active Participation (Individual) (10%) 10 % 05/03/2019 31/05/2019 1,2,3,4,5,6
Assessment 7: Long Quiz 1 (Individual) (10%) 10 % 04/04/2019 11/04/2019 4,5
Assessment 8: Long Quiz 2 (Individual) (10%) 10 % 30/05/2019 04/07/2019 4,5

Policies

ANU has educational policies, procedures and guidelines, which are designed to ensure that staff and students are aware of the University’s academic standards, and implement them. Students are expected to have read the Academic Misconduct Rule before the commencement of their course. Other key policies and guidelines include:

Assessment Requirements

The ANU is using Turnitin to enhance student citation and referencing techniques, and to assess assignment submissions as a component of the University's approach to managing Academic Integrity. For additional information regarding Turnitin please visit the ANU Online website Students may choose not to submit assessment items through Turnitin. In this instance you will be required to submit, alongside the assessment item itself, hard copies of all references included in the assessment item.

Moderation of Assessment

Marks that are allocated during Semester are to be considered provisional until formalised by the College examiners meeting at the end of each Semester. If appropriate, some moderation of marks might be applied prior to final results being released.

Participation

Contribution and participation in class are central components of the learning process in this course. Each student is encouraged to attend tutorials and lectures fully prepared. This includes completing any self-assessments required and completing the assigned readings for each class. If you do not complete your self-assessments in time for the lecture or tutorial when they are being scored and discussed, you will not know how to interpret them, and you will fall behind. Furthermore, it will be obvious whether you have completed the readings each week because you will either be actively participating in the weekly discussions and exercises in the tutorials, or you will be sitting there looking blank and lost. Remember, all material from the assigned readings is examinable so it is to your benefit that you keep up with your weekly readings and participate in the discussion and activities to solidify your understanding.

 The following are some examples of participation:

* Sharing relevant ideas, observations and personal experiences in class and/or the activity sheets

* Raising and answering substantive issues and questions

* Pointing out relationships to earlier topics and discussions

* Helping others develop their views and ideas

*Participating in structured Lecture and Tutorial learning activities and submitting brief reports (e.g., activity sheets) on them

Examination(s)

There are no examinations for this course; instead, two long quizzes (30 minutes) will be administered in class (lecture).

Assessment Task 1

Value: 0 %
Due Date: 04/04/2019
Return of Assessment: 11/04/2019
Learning Outcomes: 1,2,3,4

Assessment 1: Theme Development (formative feedback, individual)

Purpose: Students will formulate two themes that can be submitted for formative feedback from your tutor. This is during the same lecture as the workshop on how to write your Self -Assessment Report (April 4). Your submission can be handwritten. You can submit a maximum of two themes. No marks will be allocated.

Deadline: April 4 2019 (part of the workshop)

Preparation: A workshop will be held on April 4 to help the students prepare for their assessment

Assessment Task 2

Value: 35 %
Due Date: 16/05/2019
Return of Assessment: 28/05/2019
Learning Outcomes: 1,2,3,4,5

Assessment 2: Self-assessment Report & Portfolio (Individual) (35%)

Purpose: To help you develop personal awareness such that you can determine a career path that will ‘fit’ you best. Early in the course you will be provided with assessment tools that will help to assess your intelligence, values, interests, personality, and skills. You will then have an opportunity to reflect on the results from these tools and synthesise them into a meaningful report that will hopefully provide new insights and recommendations for your future.

Deadline: May 16, 2019. An electronic version of the 4000-word self-assessment report (without the appendices) will be submitted via Turnitin. A hard copy of the self-assessment report along with the appendices will be submitted at the RSM Office by COB on May 16. (Late submissions will only be allowed if a request for extension is made in writing and granted in accordance with the Student Assessment (Coursework) Policy and Procedure.)

Preparation: A workshop will be held on April 4 to help the students prepare for this assessment.

Required Format and Marking: Please see Wattle for the marking criteria and specific guidelines in preparing the self-assessment report.

Assessment Task 3

Value: 10 %
Due Date: 23/04/2019
Return of Assessment: 30/04/2019
Learning Outcomes: 1,4,5,6

Assessment 3: Empirical Research Presentation/Group Report (Group) (10%)

Purpose: The purpose of the linked Assessment 3 & 4 is twofold: firstly, for you to have a deeper understanding of current research in career management and appreciate how research can inform managerial practice, personal development, and career management. Secondly, for you to improve your presentation skills such that you have experience in delivering useful information in an understandable and engaging way, leading a group of people in thinking critically about an issue, and facilitating a group discussion.

Deadline: Commencing on April 23, groups will be given 30 minutes to make an oral presentation in tutorial class of their empirical research review. Groups will be assigned specific weeks to do this. No extensions are allowed for this assessment as the group presentation schedules are arranged /finalised at the beginning of the semester.  

Preparation: An orientation on how to prepare for your research presentation will be given in the tutorial

Required Format and Marking: Please see Wattle for specific guidelines and the marking criteria.

Assessment Task 4

Value: 20 %
Due Date: 30/04/2019
Return of Assessment: 07/05/2019
Learning Outcomes: 1,4,5,6

Assessment 4: Empirical Research Review Paper (Group) (20%)

Purpose: The purpose of the linked Assessment 3 & 4 is twofold: firstly, for you to have a deeper understanding of current research in career management and appreciate how research can inform managerial practice, personal development, and career management. Secondly, for you to improve your presentation skills such that you have experience in delivering useful information in an understandable and engaging way, leading a group of people in thinking critically about an issue, and facilitating a group discussion.

Deadline: A hard copy of the 2500-word empirical research review (based on Assessment 3, the group research presentation) will be submitted one week after your group’s class report. An electronic version of the report will also be submitted via Turnitin. No extensions are allowed for this assessment as the group presentation schedules are arranged /finalised at the beginning of the semester.  

Preparation: An orientation on how to write your research report will be given in the tutorial

Required Format and Marking: Please see Wattle for specific guidelines and the marking criteria.

Assessment Task 5

Value: 5 %
Due Date: 28/02/2019
Return of Assessment: 31/05/2019
Learning Outcomes: 1,2,3,4,5,6

Assessment 5: Structured Learning Activities (Individual and Group) (0.5% each x 10 activities = 5% total)

Purpose: Structured Learning Activities (SLAs) are brief in-class or online activities where students can immediately practice or apply the key concepts taken up in that week’s lecture. These activities are varied – they can take the form of role-playing, self-critiquing exercises, a mock quiz show, or simulating an Assessment Centre activity such as a leaderless group discussion. A short written report on insights from the activity will be submitted in class or online at the end of each activity.  

Assessment Task 6

Value: 10 %
Due Date: 05/03/2019
Return of Assessment: 31/05/2019
Learning Outcomes: 1,2,3,4,5,6

Assessment 6: Contribution and Active Participation (Individual) (10%)

Purpose: Contribution and participation in class are central components of the learning process in this course. Each student is encouraged to attend tutorials and lectures fully prepared. This includes completing any self-assessments required and completing the assigned readings for each class. If you do not complete your self-assessments in time for the lecture or tutorial when they are being scored and discussed, you will not know how to interpret them, and you will fall behind. Furthermore, it will be obvious whether you have completed the readings each week because you will either be actively participating in the weekly discussions and exercises in the tutorials, or you will be sitting there looking blank and lost. Remember, all material from the assigned readings is examinable so it is to your benefit that you keep up with your weekly readings and participate in the discussion and activities to solidify your understanding.

 The following are some examples of participation:

* Sharing relevant ideas, observations and personal experiences in class and/or the activity sheets

* Raising and answering substantive issues and questions

* Pointing out relationships to earlier topics and discussions

* Helping others develop their views and ideas

From April 23 onwards, there will be a group presenting in tutorial each week that has done extra background reading, and your tutor will also be there to help guide your understanding. Make sure you take the opportunity to question and clarify your understanding! Please note also that you are responsible for all class announcements and handouts, whether you are present or not. Be alert for possible changes.

Assessment Task 7

Value: 10 %
Due Date: 04/04/2019
Return of Assessment: 11/04/2019
Learning Outcomes: 4,5

Assessment 7: Long Quiz 1 (Individual) (10%)

Purpose: This is the first of the two long quizzes (i.e., multiple choice questions) that will be administered during the semester. Quizzes focus on understanding of theories and research relevant to career development. All multiple-choice questions do not involve memorisation; they assess your ability to apply key concepts and theories in practical workplace situations.

Preparation: An orientation and practice test will be held on March 28 – How to ace multiple choice quizzes.

Schedule: April 4 2019 (Make-up quiz will only be allowed if a request for extension is made in writing and granted in accordance with the Student Assessment (Coursework) Policy and Procedure.)

Assessment Task 8

Value: 10 %
Due Date: 30/05/2019
Return of Assessment: 04/07/2019
Learning Outcomes: 4,5

Assessment 8: Long Quiz 2 (Individual) (10%)

Purpose: This is the second of the two long quizzes (i.e., multiple choice questions) that will be administered during the semester. Quizzes focus on understanding of theories and research relevant to career development. All multiple-choice questions do not involve memorisation; they assess your ability to apply key concepts and theories in practical workplace situations.

Preparation: An orientation and practice test will be held on March 28 – How to ace multiple choice quizzes.

Schedule: May 30 2019 (Make-up quiz will only be allowed if a request for extension is made in writing and granted in accordance with the Student Assessment (Coursework) Policy and Procedure.)

Academic Integrity

Academic integrity is a core part of our culture as a community of scholars. At its heart, academic integrity is about behaving ethically. This means that all members of the community commit to honest and responsible scholarly practice and to upholding these values with respect and fairness. The Australian National University commits to embedding the values of academic integrity in our teaching and learning. We ensure that all members of our community understand how to engage in academic work in ways that are consistent with, and actively support academic integrity. The ANU expects staff and students to uphold high standards of academic integrity and act ethically and honestly, to ensure the quality and value of the qualification that you will graduate with. The University has policies and procedures in place to promote academic integrity and manage academic misconduct. Visit the following Academic honesty & plagiarism website for more information about academic integrity and what the ANU considers academic misconduct. The ANU offers a number of services to assist students with their assignments, examinations, and other learning activities. The Academic Skills and Learning Centre offers a number of workshops and seminars that you may find useful for your studies.

Online Submission

The ANU uses Turnitin to enhance student citation and referencing techniques, and to assess assignment submissions as a component of the University's approach to managing Academic Integrity. While the use of Turnitin is not mandatory, the ANU highly recommends Turnitin is used by both teaching staff and students. For additional information regarding Turnitin please visit the ANU Online website.

Hardcopy Submission

For some forms of assessment (hand written assignments, art works, laboratory notes, etc.) hard copy submission is appropriate when approved by the Associate Dean (Education). Hard copy submissions must utilise the Assignment Cover Sheet. Please keep a copy of tasks completed for your records.

Late Submission

Late submission of assessment tasks without an extension are penalised at the rate of 5% of the possible marks available per working day or part thereof. Late submission of assessment tasks is not accepted after 10 working days after the due date, or on or after the date specified in the course outline for the return of the assessment item.

Referencing Requirements

Accepted academic practice for referencing sources that you use in presentations can be found via the links on the Wattle site, under the file named “ANU and College Policies, Program Information, Student Support Services and Assessment”. Alternatively, you can seek help through the Students Learning Development website.

Returning Assignments

All assignments will be marked and where appropriate, feedback (e.g., written and/or verbal comments) will be provided either:

·       in class (as feedback to the whole class, presenting groups, and/or individuals), or

·       in person by appointment with the course lecturer, or

·       via the course Wattle site (e.g., numerical marks)

Extensions and Penalties

Extensions and late submission of assessment pieces are covered by the Student Assessment (Coursework) Policy and Procedure The Course Convener may grant extensions for assessment pieces that are not examinations or take-home examinations. If you need an extension, you must request an extension in writing on or before the due date. If you have documented and appropriate medical evidence that demonstrates you were not able to request an extension on or before the due date, you may be able to request it after the due date.

Resubmission of Assignments

You are allowed to resubmit your assignments before the specific deadlines. Any submission done after the deadline will be considered as a late submission and the listed penalty conditions will apply.

Privacy Notice

The ANU has made a number of third party, online, databases available for students to use. Use of each online database is conditional on student end users first agreeing to the database licensor’s terms of service and/or privacy policy. Students should read these carefully. In some cases student end users will be required to register an account with the database licensor and submit personal information, including their: first name; last name; ANU email address; and other information. In cases where student end users are asked to submit ‘content’ to a database, such as an assignment or short answers, the database licensor may only use the student’s ‘content’ in accordance with the terms of service — including any (copyright) licence the student grants to the database licensor. Any personal information or content a student submits may be stored by the licensor, potentially offshore, and will be used to process the database service in accordance with the licensors terms of service and/or privacy policy. If any student chooses not to agree to the database licensor’s terms of service or privacy policy, the student will not be able to access and use the database. In these circumstances students should contact their lecturer to enquire about alternative arrangements that are available.

Distribution of grades policy

Academic Quality Assurance Committee monitors the performance of students, including attrition, further study and employment rates and grade distribution, and College reports on quality assurance processes for assessment activities, including alignment with national and international disciplinary and interdisciplinary standards, as well as qualification type learning outcomes. Since first semester 1994, ANU uses a grading scale for all courses. This grading scale is used by all academic areas of the University.

Support for students

The University offers students support through several different services. You may contact the services listed below directly or seek advice from your Course Convener, Student Administrators, or your College and Course representatives (if applicable).
Dr Maria Emma Liwag
58461
maria.liwag@anu.edu.au

Research Interests


child and adolescent development in general; career development in particular; career adaptability, STEM career entry and persistence

Dr Maria Emma Liwag

Tuesday 13:00 17:00
Tuesday 13:00 17:00
Dr Maria Emma Liwag
58461
maria.liwag@anu.edu.au

Research Interests


Dr Maria Emma Liwag

Tuesday 13:00 17:00
Tuesday 13:00 17:00
Catherine Deen
54294
catherine.deen@anu.edu.au

Research Interests


Catherine Deen

Wednesday 14:00 16:00

Responsible Officer: Registrar, Student Administration / Page Contact: Website Administrator / Frequently Asked Questions