• Class Number 2682
  • Term Code 2930
  • Class Info
  • Unit Value 6 units
  • Topic On Campus
  • Mode of Delivery Online or In Person
  • COURSE CONVENER
    • Dr Anna Edmundson
  • LECTURER
    • Dr Anna Edmundson
  • Class Dates
  • Class Start Date 25/02/2019
  • Class End Date 31/05/2019
  • Census Date 31/03/2019
  • Last Date to Enrol 04/03/2019
SELT Survey Results

Internship 2 provides students in the Museum and Heritage Studies Program who are completing or have already completed MUSC 8004: Internship 1. It is an additional practical and customised opportunity to experience how cultural, collecting and other related agencies work. Students undertake a workplace-based placement with an agreed cultural and collecting institution, heritage agency, independent professional academic or consultant, or equivalent. Students will be supported by the ANU internship co-ordinator, but will be under the day-to-day supervision of a workplace-based supervisor nominated by the host institution or professional. Students will generally be given opportunities to experience the breadth and variety of the agency's professional role in curatorial, conservation, registration, public program, front of house and exhibitions, or other roles as appropriate to the placement. However, in consultation with the Internship Co-ordinator and the agency supervisor, the internship may also be designed to allow a student to work within a more confined context on a specific project.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills to:
  1. Demonstrate a working knowledge and critical engagement with the agency, institution, or sector interned within;
  2. Gain skills required for humanities research and museum work, including data-collection, analysis, and verbal and written presentation at the standard of a Master's degree;
  3. Gain an understanding and a basic set of skills required for working in the agency, institution, or sector interned within, including a functioning knowledge of current industry standards and protocols, policy frameworks, and funding regimes;
  4. Model best practice and have a commitment to ethical, reflective practice in relation to the agency, institution, or sector interned within; and
  5. Compare and contrast the learnings from this internship with those learned from MUSC8004
    Internship 1.

Field Trips

The internship is conducted at a host institution off campus. Field trips may be required by the host institution. 

Additional Course Costs

Students are required to regularly update their reflective journal online, hence require access to adequate computer facilities and Internet connections (broadband recommended). In addition to the fees for this course, students are responsible for all travel expenses associated with attending the host institution. 

Required Resources

Commonwealth supported students and domestic full-fee paying students generally must be able to complete the requirements of their program of study without the imposition of fees that are additional to the student contribution amount or tuition fees.

Provided that its payment is in accordance with the Act, a fee is of a kind that is into any one or more of the following categories:

  1. It is a charge for a good or service that is not essential to the course of study.
  2. It is a charge for an alternative form, or alternative forms, of access to a good or service that is an essential component of the course of study but is otherwise made readily available at no additional fee by the higher education provider. 
  3. It is a charge for an essential good or service that the student has the choice of acquiring from a supplier other than the higher education provider and is for:
  4. equipment or items which become the physical property of the student and are not consumed during the course of study; or
  5. food, transport and accommodation costs associated with the provision of field trips that form part of the course of study.
  6. It is a fine or a penalty provided it is imposed principally as a disincentive and not in order to raise revenue or cover administrative costs.

Staff Feedback

Students will be given feedback through written comment and discussion online in their reflective journal on Wattle and through a final assessment report.

Student Feedback

ANU is committed to the demonstration of educational excellence and regularly seeks feedback from students. Students are encouraged to offer feedback directly to their Course Convener or through their College and Course representatives (if applicable). The feedback given in these surveys is anonymous and provides the Colleges, University Education Committee and Academic Board with opportunities to recognise excellent teaching, and opportunities for improvement. The Surveys and Evaluation website provides more information on student surveys at ANU and reports on the feedback provided on ANU courses.

Other Information

Referencing requirements:

The preferred referencing system is Harvard. See https://academicskills.anu.edu.au/resources/handouts/harvard-referencing.

Class Schedule

Week/Session Summary of Activities Assessment
1 Internship
2 Internship
3 Internship
4 Internship
5 Internship
6 Internship
7 Internship
8 Internship
9 Internship
10 Internship
11 Internship Negotiated work plan, reflective journal, placement specific task & workplace supervisor’s report
12 Internship

Assessment Summary

Assessment task Value Due Date Return of assessment Learning Outcomes
Negotiated work plan (pass/fail) 0 % 31/05/2019 30/06/2019 1
Reflective journal 20 % 31/05/2019 30/06/2019 1, 3
Placement specific task 35 % 31/05/2019 30/06/2019 1, 2, 3, 4
Workplace supervisor’s report 45 % 31/05/2019 30/06/2019 4

* If the Due Date and Return of Assessment date are blank, see the Assessment Tab for specific Assessment Task details

Policies

ANU has educational policies, procedures and guidelines, which are designed to ensure that staff and students are aware of the University’s academic standards, and implement them. Students are expected to have read the Academic Misconduct Rule before the commencement of their course. Other key policies and guidelines include:

Assessment Requirements

The ANU is using Turnitin to enhance student citation and referencing techniques, and to assess assignment submissions as a component of the University's approach to managing Academic Integrity. For additional information regarding Turnitin please visit the ANU Online website. Students may choose not to submit assessment items through Turnitin. In this instance you will be required to submit, alongside the assessment item itself, hard copies of all references included in the assessment item.

Moderation of Assessment

Marks that are allocated during Semester are to be considered provisional until formalised by the College examiners meeting at the end of each Semester. If appropriate, some moderation of marks might be applied prior to final results being released.

Examination(s)

NA

Assessment Task 1

Value: 0 %
Due Date: 31/05/2019
Return of Assessment: 30/06/2019
Learning Outcomes: 1

Negotiated work plan (pass/fail)

Students are required to negotiate with host supervisor the tasks that will be allotted to them during their internship. It will be submitted after three working days. The ANU supervisor will approve this.

Assessment Task 2

Value: 20 %
Due Date: 31/05/2019
Return of Assessment: 30/06/2019
Learning Outcomes: 1, 3

Reflective journal

Students are required to post daily reflections on Wattle and submit a final composite version within seven days of completion of internship.

Assessment rubrics:

Word limit: 2500-5000 words

Value: 20%

Presentation requirements: online

Estimated return date: NA

Individual Assessment 

Rubric

CriterionExcellentVery goodAdequateInadequate/ unsatisfactory

Number of entries (over duration of internship) 

More than 18 

15-18

10-12 

Less than 10 

Length of overall submission (excluding references)

2500-5000 words

2500-5000 words

2500 words 

Less than 2000 words

Description (i.e. this is what I did) 

All descriptions of daily experiences are very detailed in terms of both situations and people. Includes detailed reference to internal or external material pertinent to the situation

Most descriptions of daily experiences are detailed in terms of both situations and people. Includes detailed reference to internal or external material pertinent to the situation

Descriptions of daily experiences are limited, but include some details of either situations or people. Includes some reference to internal or external material pertinent to the situation.

Descriptions of daily experiences are limited or lacking, with few details of either situations or people. Includes little or no reference to internal or external material pertinent to the situation.

Practitioner’s reasoning (i.e. what I did and why)

All descriptions of daily experiences include good explanations of rationale for actions/decisions 

Most descriptions of daily experiences include good explanations of rationale for actions/decisions

Some descriptions of daily experiences include explanations of rationale for actions/decisions 

Few or no descriptions of daily experiences include explanations of rationale for actions/decisions

Critical reflection: consideration of intellectual, moral or ethical issues relevant to the described events (i.e. how the situation was affected by organisational, professional, political or power relations/circumstances within or outside the museum) 

All descriptions of daily experiences include good critical reflection about rationales, actions, decisions, stakeholders’ influences etc. Most responses are insightful and thoughtful, and show evidence of intellectual engagement with the internship’s roles and responsibilities within the host institution.  

Most descriptions of daily experiences include good critical reflection about rationales, actions, decisions, stakeholders’ influences etc. At least some responses are insightful and thoughtful, and show evidence of intellectual engagement with the internship’s roles and responsibilities within the host institution.

Some descriptions of daily experiences include good critical reflection about rationales, actions, decisions, stakeholders’ influences etc. There is some evidence of intellectual engagement with the internship’s roles and responsibilities within the host institution.

Few or no descriptions of daily experiences include good critical reflection about rationales, actions, decisions, stakeholders’ influences etc. There is little or no evidence of intellectual engagement with the internship’s roles and responsibilities within the host institution.

Reference to theory or other authors’ work 

Several references are made to relevant theory or other authors’ ideas, and sources are cited. 

Some references are made to relevant theory or other authors’ ideas, and sources are cited.

A few references are made to relevant theory or other authors’ ideas, and some sources are cited.

Few or no references are made to relevant theory or other authors’ ideas and no sources are cited.

Reference to relevant internal or external material necessary to internship, material theory or other authors’ work

Several references are made to relevant theory or other authors’ ideas, and sources are cited. 

Some references are made to relevant theory or other authors’ ideas, and sources are cited.

A few references are made to relevant theory or other authors’ ideas, and some sources are cited.

Few or no references are made to relevant theory or other authors’ ideas and no sources are cited. 

Assessment Task 3

Value: 35 %
Due Date: 31/05/2019
Return of Assessment: 30/06/2019
Learning Outcomes: 1, 2, 3, 4

Placement specific task

After discussion with the work-based supervisor and Internship Coordinator, students first write a concise proposal (identifying topic, format, resources to be used, skills to be developed, and relevant outcomes/products) and then produce a final written document (2000 - 2500 words) for either:

  • written documentation (2000 - 2500 words) for a task/topic relevant and specific to the placement, which could include:
  • Significance report
  • Project plan
  • Public program proposal/plan
  • Interpretation plan
  • Review/evaluation
  • Report of specific project or situation (but not a report on the internship as such)

OR

  • write a discussion paper or research essay (2000-2500 words) that contextualises and reflects on the workplace experience against contemporary politics or key historical/theoretical issues. This could include a critical analytical review of an exhibition, report or process in which the student was involved.

Assessment rubrics:

Word limit: 2500-5000 words

Value: 35%

Presentation requirements: online

Estimated return date: Within one week of submission

Individual Assessment 


Note for rubric: *Resource material can included a wide range of primary and secondary material including academic sources (books, journals), oral history records, films or archives, policy material, interviews with key sources (producers or audiences of cultural material) or with experts in the area (which students may themselves choose to conduct as part of this assignment).


Rubric for essay/review format:

Rubric

CriterionExcellentVery goodAdequateInadequate/ unsatisfactory

Length of overall submission (excluding references)

2000-2500 words 

2500-2700 words

1900-2000 words

Less than 1900 words or more than 2700 words

Suitability of topic to internship

Highly suitable, highly relevant to host institution and to internship learning outcomes

Very suitable, relevant to host institution and/or internship learning outcomes

Suitable, but not so relevant to host institution or internship learning outcomes

Not suitable or not relevant to host institution or internship learning outcomes

Content 

Clearly and concisely identifies and summarises all key issues, establishes their relevance to the task/project, and follows these through coherently to a logical conclusion

Clearly and concisely identifies and summarises most key issues, establishes their relevance to the task/project, and mostly follows these through coherently to a logical conclusion

Clearly and concisely identifies and summarises some key issues, establishes their relevance to the task/project, and mostly follows some of these through coherently to a logical conclusion

Identifies and summarises some key issues, but does not address their relevance to the task/project, and generally fails to follow these through in a coherent manner

Critical reflection: consideration of intellectual, moral or ethical issues relevant to the tasks (e.g. how the situation was affected by organisational, professional, political or power relations/circumstances within or outside the museum) 

High level of critical analysis; writer able to engage clearly with the issues raised (e.g. rationales, actions, decision, stakeholders’ influences) and analyse/critique them in a very thoughtful manner, showing very good evidence of intellectual engagement with the internship’s roles and responsibilities within the host institution

Good level of critical analysis; writer able to engage with most issues (e.g. rationales, actions, decision, stakeholders’ influences) and analyse/critique them thoughtfully manner, showing good evidence of intellectual engagement with the internship’s roles and responsibilities within the host institution

Some critical analysis; writer able to engage with at least some of the issues (e.g. rationales, actions, decision, stakeholders’ influences) and analyse/critique them. Limited evidence of intellectual engagement with the internship’s roles and responsibilities within the host institution 

Limited or no critical analysis; writer unable to engage with at the issues and analyse/critique them. there is little evidence of intellectual engagement with the internship’s roles and responsibilities within the host institution 

Structure (introduction, key issues, conclusion) 

Very well structured; clear introduction identifies key issues and arguments; key arguments clearly highlighted through subheadings; strong conclusion pulls together key arguments and reiterates their importance 

Well structured; clear introduction identifies key issues and arguments; key arguments highlighted through use of sub-headings; strong conclusion pulls together key arguments 

Some structure; introduction identifies papers clearly but weaker on identifying key issues and arguments; key arguments not well delineated; conclusion is brief and serves to end the essay

Poor structure; very weak or no introduction; key arguments not well delineated; very weak or no conclusion

Logic and clarity (flow, one point leading to the next) 

Very logical flow, each point clearly leading to the next, well ‘sign-posted’ throughout. Sentences very clearly written using plain English. Very good paragraph structure with paragraphs clearly covering different points but very well connected to preceding and succeeding paragraphs 

Logical flow, most point clearly leading to the next, mostly well ‘signposted’. Sentences clearly written using plain English. Good paragraph structure with paragraphs mostly well connected to preceding and succeeding paragraphs

Mostly good flow, but some rambling. Limited ‘sign-posting’. Lack of clarity in some sentences, indirect and/or convoluted language. Weak paragraph structure with paragraphs of different lengths and poor topic focus 

Poor flow, significant rambling. Limited or no ‘signposting’. Lack of clarity in some sentences. Indirect and/or convoluted language. Weak paragraph structure with paragraphs of different lengths and poor topic focus 

Reference to relevant internal or external material necessary to internship theory or other authors’ work* 

Several references are made to relevant theory or other authors’ ideas 

Some references are made to relevant theory or other authors’ ideas 

A few references are made to relevant theory or other authors’ ideas, and some sources are cited

Few or no references are made to relevant theory or other authors’ ideas and no sources are cited.

Evidence of independent research skills, through the use of libraries, archives and other sources*

Evidence of excellent independent research skills and extensive use of available resources

Evidence of good independent research skills and good use of available resources

Evidence of some independent research skills and limited use of available resources 

Little or no evidence of independent research skills and/or use of available resources

Reference citation

All sources are cited appropriately 

All or almost all sources are cited but some referencing is incomplete or inadequate 

Most sources are cited and/or some referencing is incomplete or inadequate

Few or no sources are cited and/or some referencing is incomplete or inadequate

Acknowledgements

Effective and complete acknowledgment of relevant host institution sources or assistance

Good acknowledgment of relevant host institution sources or assistance

Some acknowledgment of relevant host institution sources or assistance

None or inadequate acknowledgment of relevant host institution sources or assistance

Assessment Task 4

Value: 45 %
Due Date: 31/05/2019
Return of Assessment: 30/06/2019
Learning Outcomes: 4

Workplace supervisor’s report

Students are required to give their host supervisor the pro-forma to assess their internship. This is also available on Wattle. The supervisor is to email it directly to the ANU supervisor (sharon.peoples@anu.edu.au ).

Assessment rubrics:

Word limit: as per form

Value: 45%

Presentation requirements: online

Estimated return date: This is a confidential document that students do not see but in the final report to the student the ANU supervisor can paraphrase details.

Individual Assessment 

Academic Integrity

Academic integrity is a core part of our culture as a community of scholars. At its heart, academic integrity is about behaving ethically. This means that all members of the community commit to honest and responsible scholarly practice and to upholding these values with respect and fairness. The Australian National University commits to embedding the values of academic integrity in our teaching and learning. We ensure that all members of our community understand how to engage in academic work in ways that are consistent with, and actively support academic integrity. The ANU expects staff and students to uphold high standards of academic integrity and act ethically and honestly, to ensure the quality and value of the qualification that you will graduate with. The University has policies and procedures in place to promote academic integrity and manage academic misconduct. Visit the following Academic honesty & plagiarism website for more information about academic integrity and what the ANU considers academic misconduct. The ANU offers a number of services to assist students with their assignments, examinations, and other learning activities. The Academic Skills and Learning Centre offers a number of workshops and seminars that you may find useful for your studies.

Online Submission

You will be required to electronically sign a declaration as part of the submission of your assignment. Please keep a copy of the assignment for your records. Unless an exemption has been approved by the Associate Dean (Education) as submission must be through Turnitin.

The Workplace Supervisor Report is emailed directly to the ANU supervisor (anna.edmundson@anu.edu.au).

Hardcopy Submission

For some forms of assessment (hand written assignments, art works, laboratory notes, etc.) hard copy submission is appropriate when approved by the Associate Dean (Education). Hard copy submissions must utilise the Assignment Cover Sheet. Please keep a copy of tasks completed for your records.

Late Submission

Late submission of assessment tasks without an extension are penalised at the rate of 5% of the possible marks available per working day or part thereof. Late submission of assessment tasks is not accepted after 10 working days after the due date, or on or after the date specified in the course outline for the return of the assessment item. Late submission is not accepted for take-home examinations.

Referencing Requirements

Accepted academic practice for referencing sources that you use in presentations can be found via the links on the Wattle site, under the file named “ANU and College Policies, Program Information, Student Support Services and Assessment”. Alternatively, you can seek help through the Students Learning Development website.

Returning Assignments

All written papers will be marked and commented on, scanned and uploaded to Wattle. 

Extensions and Penalties

Extensions and late submission of assessment pieces are covered by the Student Assessment (Coursework) Policy and Procedure. The Course Convener may grant extensions for assessment pieces that are not examinations or take-home examinations. If you need an extension, you must request an extension in writing on or before the due date. If you have documented and appropriate medical evidence that demonstrates you were not able to request an extension on or before the due date, you may be able to request it after the due date.

Resubmission of Assignments

In cases determined by the course convenor, students may resubmit some or all assignments.

Privacy Notice

The ANU has made a number of third party, online, databases available for students to use. Use of each online database is conditional on student end users first agreeing to the database licensor’s terms of service and/or privacy policy. Students should read these carefully. In some cases student end users will be required to register an account with the database licensor and submit personal information, including their: first name; last name; ANU email address; and other information.
In cases where student end users are asked to submit ‘content’ to a database, such as an assignment or short answers, the database licensor may only use the student’s ‘content’ in accordance with the terms of service – including any (copyright) licence the student grants to the database licensor. Any personal information or content a student submits may be stored by the licensor, potentially offshore, and will be used to process the database service in accordance with the licensors terms of service and/or privacy policy.
If any student chooses not to agree to the database licensor’s terms of service or privacy policy, the student will not be able to access and use the database. In these circumstances students should contact their lecturer to enquire about alternative arrangements that are available.

Distribution of grades policy

Academic Quality Assurance Committee monitors the performance of students, including attrition, further study and employment rates and grade distribution, and College reports on quality assurance processes for assessment activities, including alignment with national and international disciplinary and interdisciplinary standards, as well as qualification type learning outcomes.

Since first semester 1994, ANU uses a grading scale for all courses. This grading scale is used by all academic areas of the University.

Support for students

The University offers students support through several different services. You may contact the services listed below directly or seek advice from your Course Convener, Student Administrators, or your College and Course representatives (if applicable).

Dr Anna Edmundson
61250044
u3423148@anu.edu.au

Research Interests


Museum studies, Pacific history, visual anthropology, digital humanities and curatorial practice.

Dr Anna Edmundson

Thursday 10:00 11:00
Thursday 10:00 11:00
Dr Anna Edmundson
61250044
anna.edmundson@anu.edu.au

Research Interests


Dr Anna Edmundson

Thursday 10:00 11:00
Thursday 10:00 11:00

Responsible Officer: Registrar, Student Administration / Page Contact: Website Administrator / Frequently Asked Questions