• Class Number 4132
  • Term Code 2930
  • Class Info
  • Unit Value 6 units
  • Mode of Delivery Online or In Person
  • COURSE CONVENER
    • AsPr Samantha Bennett
  • LECTURER
    • AsPr Samantha Bennett
  • Class Dates
  • Class Start Date 25/02/2019
  • Class End Date 31/05/2019
  • Census Date 31/03/2019
  • Last Date to Enrol 04/03/2019
SELT Survey Results

The impact of Western popular music transcends its origins in composition, recorded artefact and concert performance. Popular music and politics are inextricably linked. In just a few decades, popular music has [re]defined [sub]cultures, influenced politics & policy and empowered minority groups. Drawing upon extensive examples and contemporary scholarship, this course explores how and why contemporary popular music is one of the most widespread, meaningful, and influential cultural phenomena in the world today. Avoiding a chronological or historical approach, this course examines the political significance of popular music through a variety of cultural and contextual lens, including music aesthetics, textual analysis, race, gender and sexuality. Cultural-theoretical backdrops include a consideration of sound recording technology, ethnomusicology, feminism and 'queer theory'. Case study examples taken from broad genre spectra will illuminate the social impact of popular music and its relationship[s] to particular cultural themes such as identity, censorship and violence.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

  1. Describe the interrelationship[s] between popular music, culture and politics from several theoretical perspectives applying appropriate research methology;
  2. Evaluate the role, significance and influence of popular music across cultural, sociological and political contexts;
  3. Speculate on the potential influence of popular music on the culture[s] and politics of the future;
  4. Critically analyse popular music using appropriate tools and descriptors specific to the discipline;
  5. Demonstrate a high level of research, written and oral communication skills on the culture and politics of popular music

Research-Led Teaching

This course is delivered over 12 weeks in Semester 1. Each week, a key topic in popular music studies will be explored in depth via a lecture or seminar, with theoretical elements drawn from contemporary popular music scholarship. Additionally, relevant scholarly readings and specific track playlists accompany each session and are used to complement the class content by way of guided independent study. Furthermore, various online activities - to include discussion threads and wikis - will be used to encourage further engagement with the course.

Required Resources

  • Bennett, A. (2001) Cultures of Popular Music. Open University Press.
  • Middleton, R. (1990) Studying Popular Music. Open University Press.
  • Moore, A. (2012) Song Means: Analysing and Interpreting Recorded Popular Song. Ashgate.
  • Negus, K. (1996) Popular Music in Theory - An Introduction. Polity Press.


  • A Spotify account is recommended


Staff Feedback

Students will be given feedback in the following forms in this course:

  • All feedback on assessments is provided via Turnitin
  • Students may request verbal feedback in class, in tutorials and during student consultation hours


Student Feedback

ANU is committed to the demonstration of educational excellence and regularly seeks feedback from students. Students are encouraged to offer feedback directly to their Course Convener or through their College and Course representatives (if applicable). The feedback given in these surveys is anonymous and provides the Colleges, University Education Committee and Academic Board with opportunities to recognise excellent teaching, and opportunities for improvement. The Surveys and Evaluation website provides more information on student surveys at ANU and reports on the feedback provided on ANU courses.

Other Information

Guide to Weekly Course Sessions and Learning Resources

Week 1: Introduction & Course Outline/ Themes

Welcome to the course.

Key Concepts/ Issues:

  • Course content
  • Course structure
  • Assessments
  • Subject overview

General reading:

Reading 1: Machin, D. (2010) Analysing Popular Music: Image, Sound, Text. London: SAGE Publications. Chapter 1: Discourses of Popular Music

Reading 2: Hesmondhalgh, D. and Negus, K. (2002) Popular Music Studies. London: Hodder Education. Introduction – Popular Music Studies: Meaning, Power and Value.

Reading 3: Middleton, R. (1990) Studying Popular Music. Buckingham: Open University Press. Chapter 1 – ‘Roll Over Beethoven?’ Sites and Soundings on the Music-­Historical Map.

Viewing:

Walk on By – The Story of Popular Song:

Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a37EUHmT88s

Part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FUp2ilRQN_0

Part 3: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_SKeEfNbFSc

Part 4: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1s09k1ovS3k

Listening: Playlist TBC in class

Week 2: Text

Key Concepts/ Issues:

  • Reading popular music
  • The ‘text’ and the ‘intertext’
  • Key themes in popular music studies
  • Key scholarship

Pre Session reading:

Reading 1: Moore, A. (2001) Rock: The Primary Text. Aldershot: Ashgate. Introduction

General reading:

Reading 2: Frith, S. (1998) Performing Rites: Evaluating Popular Music. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Chapter 8 – Songs as Texts

Reading 3: Middleton, R. (2000) Reading Pop: Approaches to Textual Analysis in Popular Music. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Introduction – Locating the Popular Music Text [Richard Middleton]

Viewing: Howard Goodall’s 20th Century Greats – The Beatles http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kKK0bCSIR4E

Listening: Playlist TBC in class

Week 3: Guest Lecture – Dr Stephen Loy

Key Concepts/ Issues:

TBC

Pre Session reading:

TBC

General Reading:

TBC

Viewing:

TBC

Listening: Playlist TBC in class

Week 4: Phonography

Key Concepts/ Issues:

  • Records
  • Recorded music formats
  • Playback devices
  • Collections

Pre Session reading:

Reading 1: Bayley, A. (2010) Recorded Music: Performance, Culture and Technology. New York: Cambridge University Press. Chapter 1: The Rise and Rise of Phonomusicology. [Stephen Cottrell]

General reading:

Reading 2: Eisenberg, E. (2005) The Recording Angel. New Haven: Yale University Press. Chapter 8 – Phonography.

Reading 3: Zak, A. (2001) The Poetics of Rock: Cutting Tracks, Making Records. Berkeley: University of California Press. Chapter 1: Writing Records.

Viewing:

RCA Victor Presents ‘Sound and the Story’ [Documentary]: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2u8OpI6NZt8

The Alchemists of Sound: The BBC Radiophonic Workshop [BBC Documentary]: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFznOcOOSec

Mellodrama – Documentary by Dianna Dilworth [Trailer]: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCabuis6t2w

Listening: Playlist TBC in class

Week 5: Analysis and Meaning

Key Concepts/ Issues:

  • Analysing Popular Music
  • The ‘text’, the ‘intertext’ and the ‘context’
  • Meaning

Pre Session reading:

Reading 1: Moore, A. (2012) Song Means: Analysing and Interpreting Recorded Popular Song. Farnham: Ashgate. Chapter 1: Methodology.

General reading:

Reading 2: Middleton, R. (2000) Reading Pop: Approaches to Textual Analysis in Popular Music. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Chapter 3 – Analysing Popular Music: Theory, Method and Practice. [Philip Tagg]

Reading 3: Frith, S. (1998) Performing Rites: Evaluating Popular Music. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Chapter 12 – The Meaning of Music

Viewing:

Krautrock – The Rebirth of Germany [BBC Documentary]: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cHUwkYkn_kA

Reggae: The Story of Jamaican Music [BBC Documentary]: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WvycRljrAH4

Listening: Playlist TBC in class

Week 6: [Sub] Culture

Key Concepts/ Issues:

  • [Sub]cultural theory
  • Tribes
  • Semiotics

Pre Session reading:

Reading 1: Bennett, A., Shank, B. and Toynbee, J. (2006) The Popular Music Studies Reader. Oxon: Routledge. Chapter 12 – Subcultures or Neotribes? Rethinking the Relationship between Youth, Style and Musical Taste.

General reading:

Reading 2: Willis, S. (1993) Hardcore: Subculture American Style. In: Critical Enquiry. Vol. 19, #1, pp. 365-­383.

Reading 3: Brown, T. (2004) Subcultures, Pop Music and Politics: Skinheads and ‘Nazi Rock’ in England and Germany. In: Journal of Social History. Vol. 38, #1, pp. 157-­178.

Viewing:

National Geographic -­ Inside Straight Edge: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcOMxtwnl8M

American Goth [Documentary by Ryan Rhea]: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QDjop4XuqRE

Listening: Playlist TBC in class

Week 7: Feminism

Key Concepts/ Issues:

  • Women’s rights mediated through song
  • Girls and masculinity
  • The ‘girl group gimmick’
  • Women and musicianship

Pre Session reading:

Reading 1: Burns, L. and Lafrance, M. (2002) Disruptive Divas. New York: Routledge. Chapter 4: Courtney Love (Hole), Live Through This [1994] Musical Force: Violence and

Resistance in ‘Violet’ [Lori Burns]

General reading:

Reading 2: O’Brien, L. (2012) She Bop. London: Jawbone. Chapter 1 – Riffin’ The Scotch: From Blues to the Jazz Age

Reading 3: Reddington, H. (2012) The Lost Women of Rock. Sheffield: Equinox. Chapter 6: The Social Context: Academic Writing on Subcultures, the Rock Press and ‘Women

in Music’.

Reading 4: Whiteley, S. (2000) Women in Popular Music: Sexuality, Identity and Subjectivity. London: Routledge. Chapter 7 – Daughters of Chaos: Patti Smith, Siouxsie Sioux and the feminisation of Rock

Viewing:

Billie Holliday – The Long Night of Lady Day [Documentary]: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L1XTIxAzHI0

The Spice Girls – Giving You Everything [Documentary]: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-­c2y2xEZjUs

Listening: Playlist TBC in class

Week 8: Violence

Key Concepts/ Issues:

  • Music, violence and media
  • Crowd violence
  • ‘Real life’ violence and popular song
  • Popular music and incitement to violence

Pre Session reading:

Reading 1: Cloonan, M. and Johnson, B. (2009) Dark Side of the Tune: Popular Music and Violence. Farnham: Ashgate. Chapter 7 – Music as Violence

General reading:

Reading 2: Thorley, M. (2011) Assaulted by the iPod: The Link Between Passive Listening and Violence. In: Popular Music and Society. Vol. 34, #1, pp. 79-­96.

Reading 3: Herd, D. (2009) Changing Images of Violence in Rap Music Lyrics: 1979-­1997. In: Journal of Public Health Policy. Vol. 30, #4, pp. 395-­406. ISSN 0197-­5897

Viewing:

The Death Metal Murders [Documentary]:

Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l1grzDvPROM

Part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-­P-­xNZ7MuUk

Part 3: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u5vvryW9Xzk

Part 4: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u5vvryW9Xzk

Part 5: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vdynGKQ2DAY

Listening: Playlist TBC in class

Week 9: Audience

Key Concepts/ Issues:

  • Reception studies
  • Listening to popular music
  • Live performance contexts
  • Music and mass mediation

Pre Session reading:

Reading 1: Negus, K. (1996) Popular Music in Theory – An Introduction. Cambridge: Polity Press. Chapter 1 -­ Audiences

Viewing:

Psy – ‘Gangnam Style’: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bZkp7q19f0

Queen at Live Aid [1985]: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eQsM6u0a038

Listening: Playlist TBC in class

Week 10: Sexuality

Key Concepts/ Issues:

  • Queer Theory
  • Androgyny
  • Hetero-­normativity in popular music
  • ‘Gayness’ and ‘borrowing’

Pre Session reading:

Reading 1: Smith, R. (1995) Seduced and Abandoned: Essays on Gay Men and Popular Music. London: Cassell. Chapter 3 – Ambisexuality.

Reading 2: Gill, J. (1995) Queer Noises: Male and Female Homosexuality in Twentieth-­Century Music. London: Cassell. Chapter 11: Dire Straights – Ziggy, Iggy, Marc, Lou.

Additional reading:

Reading 3: Baker, S., Bennett, A. and Taylor, J. (2013) Redefining Mainstream Popular Music. New York: Routledge. Chapter 4: Lesbian Musicalities, Queer Strains and Celesbian Pop. [Jodie Taylor]

Reading 4: Bennett, A., Shank, B. and Toynbee, J. (2006) The Popular Music Studies Reader. Oxon: Routledge. Chapter 41: Rethinking Issues of Gender and Sexuality in Led Zeppelin – A Woman’s View of Pleasure and Power in Hard Rock. [Susan Fast]

Listening/ Watching:

Rob Halford [Judas Priest] on MTV ‘15 15’ [News Item]: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oo_sTzE6Tck

Beth Ditto and The Gossip on LGBT Youth [The Open Artist Interview]: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=karhbkLO_oM

Listening: Playlist TBC in class

Week 11: Race

Key Concepts/ Issues:

  • Race relations mediated through popular song
  • Civil rights and protest
  • Lyrical usage in hip hop
  • Mixed race musicians: image and ideology

Pre Session reading:

Reading 1: Longhurst, B. (2008) Popular Music & Society. Cambridge: Polity Press. Chapter 4: ‘Black Music’: Genres and Social Constructions.

General reading:

Reading 2: Bennett, A. (2003) Cultures of Popular Music. Maidenhead: Open University Press. Chapter 5 – Reggae and Rasta Culture.

Reading 3: Frith, S., Straw, W. and Street, J. (2001) The Cambridge Companion to Pop and Rock. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Chapter 12 – From Rice to Ice: The Face of Race in Rock and Pop [Barry Shank]

Viewing:

Martin Scorceses’s ‘The Blues’ Part 1: Feel Like Goin’ Home: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D1Sx6bvxRfI&list=PLQpIYh-­cj9fJFnbsjcWfx-­T-­XYrLK7I8c

CNN: Chuck D on Trayvon Martin: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Orlns6mHN5s

Soul Deep: The Birth of Soul: Ray Charles [BBC Documentary]: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCVuV_2ZMxI

Listening: Playlist TBC in class

Week 12: e-­Presentation

Compulsory attendance

e-­Presentation deadline

Class Schedule

Week/Session Summary of Activities Assessment
1 Lecture: Course Introduction Tutorial: Assessment 1 brief 1 - Brief
2 Lecture: Text Tutorial: Subject Tutorial
3 Lecture: Guest Lecture – TBC Tutorial: Subject Tutorial
4 Lecture: Phonography Tutorial: Subject Tutorial
5 Lecture: Analysis & Meaning Tutorial: Subject Tutorial
6 Lecture: [Sub]Culture Tutorial: Assessment 2 brief 1 - Deadline: Friday April 5th 2 - Brief
7 Lecture: Feminism Tutorial: Subject Tutorial
8 Lecture: Violence Tutorial: Subject Tutorial
9 Lecture: Audience Tutorial: Subject Tutorial
10 Lecture: Sexuality Tutorial: Assessment 2 tutorials / feedback
11 Lecture: Race Tutorial: Assessment 2 tutorials / feedback
12 Lecture: e-Presentations Tutorial: Reflection & SELT 2 - Deadline: Wednesday May 29th (In class)

Assessment Summary

Assessment task Value Due Date Return of assessment Learning Outcomes
33 1/3 Book Review & Corresponding Album Analysis 50 % 05/04/2019 26/04/2019 1,4,5
Individual Research Paper and e-­Presentation 50 % 29/05/2019 12/06/2019 2,3,5

* If the Due Date and Return of Assessment date are blank, see the Assessment Tab for specific Assessment Task details

Policies

ANU has educational policies, procedures and guidelines, which are designed to ensure that staff and students are aware of the University’s academic standards, and implement them. Students are expected to have read the Academic Misconduct Rule before the commencement of their course. Other key policies and guidelines include:

Assessment Requirements

The ANU is using Turnitin to enhance student citation and referencing techniques, and to assess assignment submissions as a component of the University's approach to managing Academic Integrity. For additional information regarding Turnitin please visit the ANU Online website. Students may choose not to submit assessment items through Turnitin. In this instance you will be required to submit, alongside the assessment item itself, hard copies of all references included in the assessment item.

Moderation of Assessment

Marks that are allocated during Semester are to be considered provisional until formalised by the College examiners meeting at the end of each Semester. If appropriate, some moderation of marks might be applied prior to final results being released.

Assessment Task 1

Value: 50 %
Due Date: 05/04/2019
Return of Assessment: 26/04/2019
Learning Outcomes: 1,4,5

33 1/3 Book Review & Corresponding Album Analysis

The 33 1/3 series of books is published by Bloomsbury Academic. There are currently more than 120 titles in the series; each book deals with one album from the popular music and rock repertoire. Author approaches vary significantly throughout the series, thus complementing the teaching and learning content featured in this module.

Using appropriate analytical tools specific to the study of popular music, as well as reference to scholarly sources, students will conduct an individual, 3000-­word critique of a 33 1/3 series book and the corresponding album.

Length: 3500 words.

Weighting: 50%

Deadline: Friday April 5th 2019

Assessment delivery method: upload to Wattle

See rubric below.

Rubric

CriteriaHD [80-­100]D [70-­79]CR [60-­69]P [50-­59]N [0-­49]

Work of exceptional quality, which demonstrates comprehensive understanding of the subject matter, mastery of relevant skills, sophisticated or original critical and conceptual analysis, and outstanding quality in clarity, precision and presentation of work.

Work of superior quality, which demonstrates a thorough knowledge and understanding of the subject matter, proficiency in relevant skills, and analytical and conceptual ability of a high order.

Work of good quality, which displays a good understanding of the subject matter and a sound grasp of relevant skills.

Work of satisfactory quality, which displays an adequate understanding of most of the subject matter and a sufficient grasp of relevant skills.

Work which is incomplete or displays an inadequate understanding of the subject matter or an inadequate grasp of relevant skills.

Criteria 1

Evidence of an individual investigation, understanding and interpretation of existing scholarly enquiry.

Criteria 2

Application of relevant analytical tools and descriptors specific to the study of the set topic.

Criteria 3

Synthesis of research, both theoretical and analytical, into a structured and coherent body of work.

Criteria 4

Articulation of argument, depth of investigation and level of criticality.

Assessment Task 2

Value: 50 %
Due Date: 29/05/2019
Return of Assessment: 12/06/2019
Learning Outcomes: 2,3,5

Individual Research Paper and e-­Presentation

Convincing scholarly audiences of the importance of popular music studies is an important, ongoing issue for academics working in the discipline. The ways in which we articulate the importance of our topic is vital.

In pairs, students will research their own choice of narrow topic on a popular music, culture and/ or political theme. Students will synthesise their research into an e-­presentation to contain multimedia elements [eg. images, film, audio, web links] Presentations will be conducted to the class cohort and assessor, with time allocated for questioning.

Presentation length: 20 minutes + Q&A.

Word count: 2000

Weighting: 50%

Deadline: Wednesday May 29th 2019 (Final week)

Assessment delivery method: in class

Rubric

CriteriaHD [80-­100]D [70-­79]CR [60-­69]P [50-­59]N [0-­49]

Work of exceptional quality, which demonstrates comprehensive understanding of the subject matter, mastery of relevant skills, sophisticated or original critical and conceptual analysis, and outstanding quality in clarity, precision and presentation of work.

Work of superior quality, which demonstrates a thorough knowledge and understanding of the subject matter, proficiency in relevant skills, and analytical and conceptual ability of a high order.

Work of good quality, which displays a good understanding of the subject matter and a sound grasp of relevant skills

Work of satisfactory quality, which displays an adequate understanding of most of the subject matter and a sufficient grasp of relevant skills.

Work which is incomplete or displays an inadequate understanding of the subject matter or an inadequate grasp of relevant skills.

Criteria 1

Evidence of an individual investigation, understanding and interpretation of existing scholarly enquiry.

Criteria 2

Application of relevant analytical tools and descriptors specific to the study of the set topic.

Criteria 3

Synthesis of research, both theoretical and analytical, into a structured and coherent body of work.

Criteria 4

Articulation of argument, depth of investigation and level of criticality.

Academic Integrity

Academic integrity is a core part of our culture as a community of scholars. At its heart, academic integrity is about behaving ethically. This means that all members of the community commit to honest and responsible scholarly practice and to upholding these values with respect and fairness. The Australian National University commits to embedding the values of academic integrity in our teaching and learning. We ensure that all members of our community understand how to engage in academic work in ways that are consistent with, and actively support academic integrity. The ANU expects staff and students to uphold high standards of academic integrity and act ethically and honestly, to ensure the quality and value of the qualification that you will graduate with. The University has policies and procedures in place to promote academic integrity and manage academic misconduct. Visit the following Academic honesty & plagiarism website for more information about academic integrity and what the ANU considers academic misconduct. The ANU offers a number of services to assist students with their assignments, examinations, and other learning activities. The Academic Skills and Learning Centre offers a number of workshops and seminars that you may find useful for your studies.

Online Submission

You will be required to electronically sign a declaration as part of the submission of your assignment. Please keep a copy of the assignment for your records. Unless an exemption has been approved by the Associate Dean (Education) as submission must be through Turnitin.

Hardcopy Submission

For some forms of assessment (hand written assignments, art works, laboratory notes, etc.) hard copy submission is appropriate when approved by the Associate Dean (Education). Hard copy submissions must utilise the Assignment Cover Sheet. Please keep a copy of tasks completed for your records.

Late Submission

No submission of assessment tasks without an extension after the due date will be permitted. If an assessment task is not submitted by the due date, a mark of 0 will be awarded.

OR

Late submission of assessment tasks without an extension are penalised at the rate of 5% of the possible marks available per working day or part thereof. Late submission of assessment tasks is not accepted after 10 working days after the due date, or on or after the date specified in the course outline for the return of the assessment item. Late submission is not accepted for take-home examinations.

Referencing Requirements

Accepted academic practice for referencing sources that you use in presentations can be found via the links on the Wattle site, under the file named “ANU and College Policies, Program Information, Student Support Services and Assessment”. Alternatively, you can seek help through the Students Learning Development website.

Extensions and Penalties

Extensions and late submission of assessment pieces are covered by the Student Assessment (Coursework) Policy and Procedure. The Course Convener may grant extensions for assessment pieces that are not examinations or take-home examinations. If you need an extension, you must request an extension in writing on or before the due date. If you have documented and appropriate medical evidence that demonstrates you were not able to request an extension on or before the due date, you may be able to request it after the due date.

Privacy Notice

The ANU has made a number of third party, online, databases available for students to use. Use of each online database is conditional on student end users first agreeing to the database licensor’s terms of service and/or privacy policy. Students should read these carefully. In some cases student end users will be required to register an account with the database licensor and submit personal information, including their: first name; last name; ANU email address; and other information.
In cases where student end users are asked to submit ‘content’ to a database, such as an assignment or short answers, the database licensor may only use the student’s ‘content’ in accordance with the terms of service – including any (copyright) licence the student grants to the database licensor. Any personal information or content a student submits may be stored by the licensor, potentially offshore, and will be used to process the database service in accordance with the licensors terms of service and/or privacy policy.
If any student chooses not to agree to the database licensor’s terms of service or privacy policy, the student will not be able to access and use the database. In these circumstances students should contact their lecturer to enquire about alternative arrangements that are available.

Distribution of grades policy

Academic Quality Assurance Committee monitors the performance of students, including attrition, further study and employment rates and grade distribution, and College reports on quality assurance processes for assessment activities, including alignment with national and international disciplinary and interdisciplinary standards, as well as qualification type learning outcomes.

Since first semester 1994, ANU uses a grading scale for all courses. This grading scale is used by all academic areas of the University.

Support for students

The University offers students support through several different services. You may contact the services listed below directly or seek advice from your Course Convener, Student Administrators, or your College and Course representatives (if applicable).

AsPr Samantha Bennett
02 6125 5761
samantha.bennett@anu.edu.au

Research Interests


popular music, sound recording, music technology, music production, popular music analysis, popular music history, sound recording and music technology history, film music, film music theory

AsPr Samantha Bennett

Wednesday 14:00 17:00
Wednesday 14:00 17:00
AsPr Samantha Bennett
55761
samantha.bennett@anu.edu.au

Research Interests


AsPr Samantha Bennett

Wednesday 14:00 17:00
Wednesday 14:00 17:00

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