• Class Number 3895
  • Term Code 3030
  • Class Info
  • Unit Value 6 units
  • Mode of Delivery In Person
  • COURSE CONVENER
    • Prof Michael Platow
  • LECTURER
    • Prof Michael Platow
  • Class Dates
  • Class Start Date 24/02/2020
  • Class End Date 05/06/2020
  • Census Date 08/05/2020
  • Last Date to Enrol 02/03/2020
SELT Survey Results

In this course, students engage in advanced, in-depth explorations of various aspects of the social psychology of groups and group life. Students will engage in depth in the analysis of the social and psychological process of social categorization into groups, the interdependencies between individuals and groups, and the cognitive, attitudinal and behavioural consequences of both social categorization and social interdependence. Throughout the course, students will have the opportunity to examine current understandings of group interactions (e.g., deviance, norms, & decision making), pro-social behaviours (e.g., cooperation, helping, trust, & fairness), social change and collective action, social influence, and stereotyping and prejudice. The course, itself, strongly integrates theory with laboratory and field data, allowing students to gain a solid understanding of advanced, contemporary insights into a range of social behaviours.


A key feature of this course is its emphasis on the importance of theory in developing an understanding of group life. This emphasis on theory, however, is balanced by a rigorous laboratory program designed to complement the lectures, while simultaneously providing hands-on lessons in experimental social psychology. Throughout the course, students will design an experiment; complete a Human Research Ethics Application; and write a formal research report Introduction, hypothesis, Methods and Results. Students will learn key features of social-psychological experimental design, including the manipulation and measurement of variables of interest, scale construction, hypothesis testing, data interpretation, as well as abstract methodological concepts such as “mediation” and “moderation”.


Critically, this course not only provides students with a supported and structured environment in which to gain a deep understanding of the social psychology of group life, but it equips students with a variety of graduate attributes (also known as employability skills) identified as important for the development of a productive workforce. Specifically, students develop an ability to communicate effectively and contribute to scholarship in social psychology; to solve problems, take individual initiative, and think critically; to understand ethical values in research; and to make sense of evidence. Achieving at high levels in this course requires good self-management, planning and organization skills.


This is an Honours Pathway Course.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

  1. Have a broad understanding of the social psychology of group life, including an understanding of interdependence, categorization, and the cognitive, attitudinal and behavioural consequences of the social psychology of group life, including interdependence and categorization.
  2. Have a deep understanding of how social identity and self-categorization processes affect the pattern and progression of group life.
  3. Have gained deeper insight into the manner in which a diverse set of social-psychological phenomena can be examined and understood by a single meta-theoretical framework and, in doing so, gain an appreciation for the role and value of theory in social psychology.
  4. Have a deeper understanding of nature and practice of social-psychological research.
  5. Be able to write two key components of a social-psychological research report (Introduction & Method), and complete a Human Research Ethics Application.

Research-Led Teaching

In PSYC3002, students will progress in depth in the analysis of the social and psychological process of social categorization into groups, the interdependencies between individuals and groups, and the cognitive, attitudinal and behavioural consequences of both social categorization and social interdependence. Throughout the course, students will have the opportunity to examine current understandings of group interactions (e.g., deviance, norms, & decision making), pro-social behaviours (e.g., cooperation, fairness), social change and collective action, social influence, and stereotyping and prejudice. The course, itself, strongly integrates theory with laboratory and field data, allowing students to gain a solid understanding of advanced, contemporary insights into a range of social behaviours.

A key feature of this course is its emphasis on the importance of theory in developing an understanding of group life. This emphasis on theory, however, is balanced by a rigorous laboratory program designed to complement the lectures, while simultaneously providing hands-on lessons in experimental social psychology. Throughout the course, students will design an experiment; complete a Human Research Ethics Application; and write a formal research report Introduction, hypothesis, Methods and Results. Students will learn key features of social-psychological experimental design, including the manipulation and measurement of variables of interest, scale construction, hypothesis testing, data interpretation, as well as abstract methodological concepts such as “mediation” and “moderation”.

PSYC3002 is an Honours Pathway Course (https://science.anu.edu.au/current-students/science-courses/honours-pathway).

Field Trips

None

Additional Course Costs

None

Examination Material or equipment

All students will be required to attend examination in person (i.e., there are no take-home examinations for this course). Other relevant information will be provided at a later date. Be sure to attend all lectures and read all information provided on the PSYC3002 2019 Wattle site once you have enrolled in this course. Information about the scheduling of the examination will be posted by the University at http://www.anu.edu.au/students/program-administration/assessments-exams/examination-timetable .

Required Resources

Ability to attend lectures and laboratory classes, and access to the internet are essential.

Staff Feedback

Students will be given feedback in the following forms in this course:

  • Written comments on assessment items

Student Feedback

ANU is committed to the demonstration of educational excellence and regularly seeks feedback from students. Students are encouraged to offer feedback directly to their Course Convener or through their College and Course representatives (if applicable). The feedback given in these surveys is anonymous and provides the Colleges, University Education Committee and Academic Board with opportunities to recognise excellent teaching, and opportunities for improvement. The Surveys and Evaluation website provides more information on student surveys at ANU and reports on the feedback provided on ANU courses.

Other Information

Please note, that where there are multiple assessment tasks of the same type (e.g., weekly quizzes), a date range is used in the Assessment Summary. The first date is the approximate due date of the first task, the return date is the approximate return date for the final task. Further information is provided in the assessment section of the class summary, and details are provided on the course Wattle site

Class Schedule

Week/Session Summary of Activities Assessment
1 (INDICATIVE) General Course Introduction & Social Interdependence: Theory Online quizzes are due weekly, and laboratory book exercises are due as per the timetabled laboratory class. The PSYC3002 Wattle site outlines specific details of each of these forms of assessment, and the due date for the Research Report Introduction and Hypothesis.
2 (INDICATIVE) Social Interdependence: Research & Theories of Groups Online quizzes are due weekly, and laboratory book exercises are due as per the timetabled laboratory class. The PSYC3002 Wattle site outlines specific details of each of these forms of assessment, and the due date for the Research Report Introduction and Hypothesis.
3 (INDICATIVE) From Interdependence to Social Identity & Social Identity and Self-Categorization Theories Online quizzes are due weekly, and laboratory book exercises are due as per the timetabled laboratory class. The PSYC3002 Wattle site outlines specific details of each of these forms of assessment, and the due date for the Research Report Introduction and Hypothesis.
4 (INDICATIVE) De-Individuation: Identity Loss vs. Identity Gain & Self-Categorical Complexity: Cross Categorization and Category Hierarchy Online quizzes are due weekly, and laboratory book exercises are due as per the timetabled laboratory class. The PSYC3002 Wattle site outlines specific details of each of these forms of assessment, and the due date for the Research Report Introduction and Hypothesis.
5 (INDICATIVE) On Superordinate Categories: In-Group Projection & On Superordinate Categories: Deviance as In-Group Loyalty Online quizzes are due weekly, and laboratory book exercises are due as per the timetabled laboratory class. The PSYC3002 Wattle site outlines specific details of each of these forms of assessment, and the due date for the Research Report Introduction and Hypothesis.
6 (INDICATIVE) Classic Understandings of Stereotypes and Stereotyping & A Self-Categorization Understanding of Stereotypes and Stereotyping Online quizzes are due weekly, and laboratory book exercises are due as per the timetabled laboratory class. The PSYC3002 Wattle site outlines specific details of each of these forms of assessment, and the due date for the Research Report Introduction and Hypothesis.
7 (INDICATIVE) Group Decision Making & Group-Based Motivation Online quizzes are due weekly, and laboratory book exercises are due as per the timetabled laboratory class. The PSYC3002 Wattle site outlines specific details of each of these forms of assessment, and the due date for the Research Report Introduction and Hypothesis.
8 (INDICATIVE) Group Cohesion & Norms and Ideologies Online quizzes are due weekly, and laboratory book exercises are due as per the timetabled laboratory class. The PSYC3002 Wattle site outlines specific details of each of these forms of assessment, and the due date for the Research Report Introduction and Hypothesis.
9 (INDICATIVE) Social Identity Management & In-Group Status and In-Group Projection Online quizzes are due weekly, and laboratory book exercises are due as per the timetabled laboratory class. The PSYC3002 Wattle site outlines specific details of each of these forms of assessment, and the due date for the Research Report Introduction and Hypothesis.
10 (INDICATIVE) Leadership: Gaining Support & Leader Qualities by Being One of Us & Leadership as Social Influence Online quizzes are due weekly, and laboratory book exercises are due as per the timetabled laboratory class. The PSYC3002 Wattle site outlines specific details of each of these forms of assessment, and the due date for the Research Report Introduction and Hypothesis.
11 (INDICATIVE) Classic Analyses of Justice & Social Identity Analyses of Justice Online quizzes are due weekly, and laboratory book exercises are due as per the timetabled laboratory class. The PSYC3002 Wattle site outlines specific details of each of these forms of assessment, and the due date for the Research Report Introduction and Hypothesis.
12 (INDICATIVE) Group-Based Emotions & Collective Action Online quizzes are due weekly, and laboratory book exercises are due as per the timetabled laboratory class. The PSYC3002 Wattle site outlines specific details of each of these forms of assessment, and the due date for the Research Report Introduction and Hypothesis.

Tutorial Registration

Students must attend five three-hour laboratory classes across the semester. Laboratory enrolment procedures will be provided on Wattle

Assessment Summary

Assessment task Value Due Date Return of assessment Learning Outcomes
Laboratory Books 20 % * * 1,2,3,4,5
Weekly On-Line Self-Quizzes 2 % * * 1,2,3,4,5
Research Report Introduction & Hypothesis 37 % 28/04/2020 19/05/2020 1,2,3,4
End of Semester Exam 40 % * 02/07/2020 1,2,3,4

* If the Due Date and Return of Assessment date are blank, see the Assessment Tab for specific Assessment Task details

Policies

ANU has educational policies, procedures and guidelines, which are designed to ensure that staff and students are aware of the University’s academic standards, and implement them. Students are expected to have read the Academic Misconduct Rule before the commencement of their course. Other key policies and guidelines include:

Assessment Requirements

The ANU is using Turnitin to enhance student citation and referencing techniques, and to assess assignment submissions as a component of the University's approach to managing Academic Integrity. For additional information regarding Turnitin please visit the ANU Online website Students may choose not to submit assessment items through Turnitin. In this instance you will be required to submit, alongside the assessment item itself, hard copies of all references included in the assessment item.

Moderation of Assessment

Marks that are allocated during Semester are to be considered provisional until formalised by the College examiners meeting at the end of each Semester. If appropriate, some moderation of marks might be applied prior to final results being released.

Participation

The Research School of Psychology considers the laboratory component of all courses to be an integral part of each course – laboratory classes may supplement and consolidate material covered in lectures or they may introduce entirely new material pertinent to the objectives of the course. As such, attendance at laboratory classes is considered to be compulsory.


It is therefore the policy of the Research School of Psychology that students will attend all laboratory classes scheduled for any course. Absences must be notified (in advance, if possible) to the tutor or course convenor, and accompanied by adequate and appropriate documentation justifying the absence. Only reasons entirely beyond the student’s control and unable to be anticipated and adjusted for at the beginning of the course will be accepted – reasons will be restricted to illness or significant personal crisis, and the accompanying documentation must be a medical certificate or other professional evidence of incapacity to attend. Clashes with other courses or with work commitments will not be accepted as reasons for absence since these can be anticipated and adjusted for at the beginning of the course.


Note that laboratory attendance includes participating in the laboratory experiments, interacting with other students (both interpersonally and to the laboratory class as a whole), completing tasks on a computer, and completing hand-written assessment tasks.

Examination(s)

The final exam for PSYC3002 must be completed in person; there is no take-home exam for this course. Students registered with ANU Access and Inclusion may be provided with specific assistance (to be determined in consultation with Access and Inclusion).


Please note, that where a date range is used in the Assessment Summary in relation to exams, the due date and return date for mid-semester exams indicate the approximate timeframe in which the exam will be held; the due and return date for end of semester exams indicate the approximate timeframe in which the exam will be held and the date official end of Semester results are released on ISIS. Students should consult the course wattle site and the ANU final examination timetable to confirm the date, time and venue of the exam.

Assessment Task 1

Value: 20 %
Learning Outcomes: 1,2,3,4,5

Laboratory Books

Four (4) Lab books

Word count: 250

Indicative value: 5% each (total 20%)


Lab Book 1: Anticipated due at the end of your laboratory class in Semester Week 4; Returned during your third laboratory class.

Lab Book 2: Anticipated due at the end of your laboratory class in Semester Week 6; Returned during your fourth laboratory class

Lab Book 3: Anticipated due at the end of your laboratory class in Semester Week 9; Returned during your fifth laboratory class

Lab Book 4: Anticipated due at the end of your laboratory class in Semester Week 11; Returned two weeks after your fifth laboratory class

Assessment Task 2

Value: 2 %
Learning Outcomes: 1,2,3,4,5

Weekly On-Line Self-Quizzes

23 four-option multiple-choice questions completed via Wattle


Value: 2.5%

Due: During the seven calendar days following each lecture via Wattle (although self-quizzes for on-line lectures are open all semester).

Returned: Immediately


Students are expected to contribute on an on-going basis throughout the semester.

Assessment Task 3

Value: 37 %
Due Date: 28/04/2020
Return of Assessment: 19/05/2020
Learning Outcomes: 1,2,3,4

Research Report Introduction & Hypothesis

Value: 37.5

Due: Anticipated Monday, 27 April, 2020, 4:00 p.m.

Returned: Up to three weeks after submission.

Assessment Task 4

Value: 40 %
Return of Assessment: 02/07/2020
Learning Outcomes: 1,2,3,4

End of Semester Exam

Value: 40

60 four-option multiple-choice questions + 10 fill-in-the-blank questions (3 hours).

The date range in the Assessment Summary indicates the start of the end of semester exam period and the date official end of semester results are released on ISIS. Please check the course Wattle site and the ANU final Examination Timetable http://www.anu.edu.au/students/program-administration/assessments-exams/examination-timetable to confirm the date, time and location exam.

Academic Integrity

Academic integrity is a core part of our culture as a community of scholars. At its heart, academic integrity is about behaving ethically. This means that all members of the community commit to honest and responsible scholarly practice and to upholding these values with respect and fairness. The Australian National University commits to embedding the values of academic integrity in our teaching and learning. We ensure that all members of our community understand how to engage in academic work in ways that are consistent with, and actively support academic integrity. The ANU expects staff and students to uphold high standards of academic integrity and act ethically and honestly, to ensure the quality and value of the qualification that you will graduate with. The University has policies and procedures in place to promote academic integrity and manage academic misconduct. Visit the following Academic honesty & plagiarism website for more information about academic integrity and what the ANU considers academic misconduct. The ANU offers a number of services to assist students with their assignments, examinations, and other learning activities. The Academic Skills and Learning Centre offers a number of workshops and seminars that you may find useful for your studies.

Online Submission

The ANU uses Turnitin to enhance student citation and referencing techniques, and to assess assignment submissions as a component of the University's approach to managing Academic Integrity. While the use of Turnitin is not mandatory, the ANU highly recommends Turnitin is used by both teaching staff and students. For additional information regarding Turnitin please visit the ANU Online website.

Hardcopy Submission

Hand-written laboratory books will be submitted in hard copy to your tutor.

Late Submission

Late submission of assessment tasks without an extension are penalised at the rate of 5% of the possible marks available per working day or part thereof. Late submission of assessment tasks is not accepted after 10 working days after the due date, or on or after the date specified in the course outline for the return of the assessment item. Late submission is not accepted for take-home examinations.

Referencing Requirements

Accepted academic practice for referencing sources that you use in presentations can be found via the links on the Wattle site, under the file named “ANU and College Policies, Program Information, Student Support Services and Assessment”. Alternatively, you can seek help through the Students Learning Development website.

Returning Assignments

Laboratory Books 1 - 3 will be returned to students in their subsequent laboratory classes. Students will be able to collect Laboratory Book 4 and their Research Report Introduction and Hypothesis from the ANU Psychology Enquiries Office.

Extensions and Penalties

Extensions and late submission of assessment pieces are covered by the Student Assessment (Coursework) Policy and Procedure The Course Convener may grant extensions for assessment pieces that are not examinations or take-home examinations. If you need an extension, you must request an extension in writing on or before the due date. If you have documented and appropriate medical evidence that demonstrates you were not able to request an extension on or before the due date, you may be able to request it after the due date.

Resubmission of Assignments

Not permitted

Privacy Notice

The ANU has made a number of third party, online, databases available for students to use. Use of each online database is conditional on student end users first agreeing to the database licensor’s terms of service and/or privacy policy. Students should read these carefully. In some cases student end users will be required to register an account with the database licensor and submit personal information, including their: first name; last name; ANU email address; and other information. In cases where student end users are asked to submit ‘content’ to a database, such as an assignment or short answers, the database licensor may only use the student’s ‘content’ in accordance with the terms of service — including any (copyright) licence the student grants to the database licensor. Any personal information or content a student submits may be stored by the licensor, potentially offshore, and will be used to process the database service in accordance with the licensors terms of service and/or privacy policy. If any student chooses not to agree to the database licensor’s terms of service or privacy policy, the student will not be able to access and use the database. In these circumstances students should contact their lecturer to enquire about alternative arrangements that are available.

Distribution of grades policy

Academic Quality Assurance Committee monitors the performance of students, including attrition, further study and employment rates and grade distribution, and College reports on quality assurance processes for assessment activities, including alignment with national and international disciplinary and interdisciplinary standards, as well as qualification type learning outcomes. Since first semester 1994, ANU uses a grading scale for all courses. This grading scale is used by all academic areas of the University.

Support for students

The University offers students support through several different services. You may contact the services listed below directly or seek advice from your Course Convener, Student Administrators, or your College and Course representatives (if applicable).
Prof Michael Platow
(02) 6125 8457
Michael.Platow@anu.edu.au

Research Interests


The Social Psychology of Group Processes and Social Change

Prof Michael Platow

By Appointment
Prof Michael Platow
(02) 6125 8457
Michael.Platow@anu.edu.au

Research Interests


Prof Michael Platow

By Appointment

Responsible Officer: Registrar, Student Administration / Page Contact: Website Administrator / Frequently Asked Questions