• Class Number 7419
  • Term Code 3160
  • Class Info
  • Unit Value 6 units
  • Mode of Delivery In Person
  • COURSE CONVENER
    • Dr Karima Laachir
  • LECTURER
    • Dr Karima Laachir
  • Class Dates
  • Class Start Date 26/07/2021
  • Class End Date 29/10/2021
  • Census Date 14/09/2021
  • Last Date to Enrol 02/08/2021
SELT Survey Results

This course broadly examines the roles played by women in the cultural sphere in modern Iran and the Middle East, where literature, cinema, music, visual and performing arts are inspired by a growing female presence. This is a topical subject that has acquired additional salience in light of the recent changes in the region. As never before, women in the region have to deal with the multiple issues of patriarchy, contested notions of modernity, identity, and authenticity, religion, political and economic participation and artistic expression. The course will focus on the role of women, as novelists, movie directors, and musicians. To introduce students to the region, it also provides background on women’s movements as well as analysis of the socio-political aspects that came to create the modern Middle East. 


The course is made up of 12 weeks of lectures which comprises of two distinct sections: Five sessions will be dedicated to explore women’s cultural contributions to modern Iran, and seven sessions will be dedicated to the other Middle East countries including: Iraq, Lebanon, Syria, Palestine, Saudi Arabia & The Persian Gulf Arab States, Egypt, and Turkey. 

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

  1. identify women’s role in the making of the culture of the Middle East through the works of writers, directors, and musicians, and the complexities of the relationship between women and the arts;
  2. recognize and analyse women’s roles and achievements in the Culture of the Middle East in the last three decades;
  3. know how to select and combine materials from a topic relevant to the role of women in Middle Eastern contemporary culture and present them in a coherent matter in a team environment;
  4. identify the elements shaping modern Middle Eastern culture through the prism of gender relations.

Staff Feedback

Students will be given feedback in the following forms in this course:

  • written comments
  • verbal comments
  • feedback to whole class, groups, individuals, focus group etc

Student Feedback

ANU is committed to the demonstration of educational excellence and regularly seeks feedback from students. Students are encouraged to offer feedback directly to their Course Convener or through their College and Course representatives (if applicable). The feedback given in these surveys is anonymous and provides the Colleges, University Education Committee and Academic Board with opportunities to recognise excellent teaching, and opportunities for improvement. The Surveys and Evaluation website provides more information on student surveys at ANU and reports on the feedback provided on ANU courses.

Class Schedule

Week/Session Summary of Activities Assessment
1 Gender in the Middle East: Orientalist Discourses and Fantasies We start by exploring the fixation on the figure of the Middle Eastern or Muslim woman during the colonial period and up to now. We will examine the orientalist discourses that have shaped so much of the scholarship, popular culture and news reporting related to the Middle East and to women in the region. These discourses on ‘culture’ and ‘religion’ have had and continue to have material impacts on the lives of Middle Easterners or those of Middle Eastern heritage, and therefore, it is crucial that we not only unpack but contextualize them and show how they have been used to dominate and marginalize the region. Essential Reading: Yegenoglu, M. (1998). Colonial Fantasies: Towards a Feminist Reading of Orientalism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (Chapter 2; ebook). Abu-Lughod, L. (2013). Do Muslim Women Need Saving? Cambridge: Harvard University Press (Chapter 1; ebook). Mikdashi, Maya (2012): “How not to study gender in the Middle East”. Jadaliyya, March 21, 2012; http://www.jadaliyya.com/pages/index/4775/how-not-to-study-gender-in-the-middle-east Naber, N. (2013). “Transnational Anti-Imperialism and Middle East Women's Studies”. Jadaliyya. Available at: https://www.jadaliyya.com/Details/28909/Transnational-Anti-Imperialism-and-Middle-East-Women%E2%80%99s-Studies Further Reading: Said, E (1978) Orientalism. Pantheon Books. Farris, S. (2017). In the Name of Women’s Rights: The Rise of Femonationalism. Durham: Duke University Press. Mahmood, S. (2009). Feminism, democracy, and empire: Islam and the War on Terror. In H. Herzog & A. Braude (Eds.), Gendering Religion and Politics, pp. 193-215. New York: Palgrave Macmillan (uploaded PDF in readings folder). Scott, J. (2007). The politics of the veil. Princeton: Princeton University Press (chapter 1; ebook available). Ewing, K. (2008). Stolen Honor: Stigmatizing Muslim Men in Berlin. Stanford: Stanford University Press (Introduction; ebook). Mohanty, C. T. (1988). Under Western eyes: Feminist scholarship and colonial discourse. Feminist Review, 30, pp. 61-88. Lewis, R. (1996). Gendering Orientalism: Race, Femininity and Representation. London: Routledge. Mikdashi, M. (2012). How not to study gender in the Middle East. Jadaliyya. Available at: https://www.jadaliyya.com/Details/25434/How-Not-to-Study-Gender-in-the-Middle-East Abu-Lughod, L. (2001). Orientalism and Middle East feminist studies. Feminist Studies, 27, pp. 101-113. Mahmood, S. & Hirschkind, C. (2002). Feminism, the Taliban, and politics of counter-insurgency. Anthropological Quarterly, 75(2), pp. 339-354. Khalid, M. (2011). Gender, orientalism and representations of the ‘Other’ in the War on Terror. Global Change, Peace & Security, 23(1), pp. 15-29.
2 Feminisms in the Middle East This week, we will examine various feminist trends in the Middle East including secular and Islamist ones and the way these movement have challenged patriarchy and oppression. We will also explore the tensions that have arisen within feminist and women’s rights movements, discussing the ways in which differences based on class, ethnicity, sexuality and other factors have impacted the development or stultification of various initiatives. Primary Reading: Badran, M. (2005). Between secular and Islamic feminism/s: Reflections on the Middle East and beyond. Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies, 1(1): 6-28 (included in readings folder). Salem, S. (2018). On transnational feminist solidarity: The case of Angela Davis in Egypt. Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 43(2), pp. 245-267 (included in readings folder). Elif Genc, Gülay Kilicaslan, Berivan Kutlay Sarikaya. "A Reflection of Kurdish Women on Revolutionary Feminism(s) and Solidarity in the MENA | Kurdistan". Kohl: a Journal for Body and Gender Research Vol. 5 No. 3 (17 December 2019): pp. 3-3. Available at: https://kohljournal.press/A-Reflection-of-Kurdish-Women. Jabiri, Afaf. (2018) 'Gender Politics of Alienation and Power Restoration: Arab Revolutions and Women's Sentiments of Loss and Despair', Feminist Review Volume: 117, Number 1, pp. 113-130 Further Reading: Sehlikoglu, S. (2018). Revisited: Muslim Women’s agency and feminist anthropology of the Middle East. Contemporary Islam, 12(1), pp. 73-92 (included in readings folder). Baba, F. (2019). On the depoliticization of the economy and activism: Notes from a feminist fresh graduate on alienation and cooptation. Kohl, 5(2), available at: https://kohljournal.press/Depoliticization-of-the-Economy Chapman, M. (2015). Feminist dilemmas and the agency of veiled Muslim women: Analyzing identities and social representations. European Journal of Women’s Studies, 23(3), 237-250. Ali, Z. (2018). Women’s political activism in Iraq: Caught between NGOization and the struggle for a civil state. International Journal of Contemporary Iraqi Studies, 12(1), pp. 35-51 (included in readings folder). Bier, L. (2011). Revolutionary Womanhood: Feminisms, Modernity, and the State in Nasser’s Egypt. Stanford: Stanford University Press (Chapter 5; ebook). Farris, S. (2017). In the Name of Women’s Rights: The Rise of Femonationalism. Durham: Duke University Press. Sukarieh, M. (2015). The first lady phenomenon: Elites, states, and the contradictory politics of women’s empowerment in the neoliberal Arab world. Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, 35(3): 575-587. Salem, S. (2016). Intersectionality and its discontents. Intersectionality as travelling theory. European Journal of Women’s Studies, 24(4), 403-418. Al-Ali, N. (2000). Secularism, Gender and the State in the Middle East: The Egyptian Women’s Movement. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Abdelmonem, A. (2015). Reconceptualizing sexual harassment in Egypt: A Longitudinal assessment of el-Taharrush el-Ginsy in Arabic online forums and anti-sexual harassment activism. Kohl, 1(1), available at: https://kohljournal.press/reconceptualizing-sexual-harassment-in-egypt Evrard, A. Y. (2014). The Moroccan Women’s Rights Movement. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press. Hatem, M. (1992). Economic and political liberation in Egypt and the demise of state Feminism. International Journal of Middle East Studies, 24(2), pp. 231-251. Al-Ali, Nadje and Pratt, Nicola (2016) 'Gender, protest and political transition in the Middle East and North Africa.' In: Steans, Jill and Tepe-Belfrage, Daneila, (eds.), Handbook on Gender in World Politics. Cheltenham, UK; Northampton, MA, USA: Edward Elgar, pp. 127-136. Al-Ali, Nadje (2012a) 'Gendering the Arab Spring.' in Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication, 5 (1): 26-31.
3 Iran: The History of Persian Women’s Social and Political Movements from the Constitutional Revolution to the Recent Presidential Election (1906-2013) Essential Reading: Mahdi, Ali Akbar, The Iranian Women’s Movement: A Century Long Struggle, Ohio, Wesleyan University. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1478-1913.2004.00067.x/pdf Esfandiari, Haleh, Reconstructed Lives: Women And Iran's Islamic Revolution, Washington, D.C. Johns Hopkins University press, c 1997. pp. 19-51. http://books.google.com.au/books?id=kwXmg2EmOSAC&pg=PP11&source=gbs_selected_ pages&cad=3#v=onepage&q&f=false Bahramitash, Roksana and Hooglund, Eric (ed.) Gender in Contemporary Iran: Pushing the Boundaries, Routledge, 2011, Chapters: 1, 6 http://www.tandfebooks.com/isbn/9780203830710 Further Reading: Neshat, Guity & Beck, Lois (ed.), Women in Iran: from 1800 to the Islamic Republic, 2004. Padidar, Parvin, Women and the Political Process in 20th Century Iran, 1995. Afkhami, Mahnaz and Erika Friedl (ed.), In The Eye Of The Storm: Women in Post- revolutionary Iran, New York, Syracuse University Press, 1994. Tabari, Azar & Yaganeh, Nahid, In the Shadow of Islam. The women’s Movement in Iran, 1982. Shahidian, Hammed, Women in Iran: Gender Politics in the Islamic Republic, 2002.
4 Iran: Breaking the Boundaries: Three Decades of Women’s Struggle for Legitimizing their Public Performance Iran: Breaking the Boundaries: Three Decades of Women’s Struggle for Legitimizing their Public Performance Essential Reading: DeBano, Wendy S., Enveloping Music in Gender, Nation, and Islam: Women's Music Festivals in Post-Revolutionary Iran, Iranian Studies, 09/2005, Volume 38, Issue 3, pp. 441 – 462. Houchang, Chehabi, Voices Unveiled: Women Singers in Iran’, in Iran and Beyond: Essays in Middle Eastern History, Rudi Matthee and Beth Baron (ed.), California, 2000, pp. 151-166. Women composers: http://library.anu.edu.au/record=b3114738 Further Reading: Vatanparast, Shadi, ‘A Look at Women, Music and the Fourth Annual Women's Yaas Music Festival’, in Bad Jens: Iranian Feminist Newsletter, December 2002 http://www.bad;ens.com/sixthedition/a4.htm Performers: http://library.anu.edu.au/record=b3114741 Videos: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UnCSAVAOrxw http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zFi-t24-ciQ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ANKqXwPVN5M http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pUkmFnBnBF4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pWWz3688cFQ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BbyRA4FVvMc music
5 Iran: Speaking Through Words and Colors: Women in Persian Literature and Visual Arts Iran: Speaking Through Words and Colors: Women in Persian Literature and Visual Arts Essential Reading: Ibadi, Shirin and Moaveni, Azadeh, Iran Awakening: One woman's journey to reclaim her life and country, Random House, 2007. Rahimieh, Nasrin and Brookshaw, D. P., Forugh Farrokhzad: Poet of Modern Iran: Iconic Woman and Feminine Pioneer of New Persian Poetry, Iran Heritage Foundation, 2010, Chapter 6. http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=558afb29-80d2-4649-8f2c- 4a05aa9734f5%40sessionmgr114&vid=1&hid=122&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ% 3d%3d#db=nlebk&AN=355548 Nafisy, Azar, 'Images of Women in Classical Persian Literature and the Contemporary Iranian Novel', eds. Mahnaz Afkhami and Erika Friedl, In the Eye of The Storm: Women in Post-revolutionary Iran, New York: Syracuse University Press, 1994. pp. 115-130. Farzaneh Milani Veils and Words: The Emerging Voices of Iranian Women Writers, New York, 1992. Further Reading: Keshavarz, Fatemeh, Jasmine and Stars: Reading More than Lolita in Tehran, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2007. pp. 33-59 & 85-109. Torab, Azam, Performing Islam: Gender and Ritual in Iran, Leiden: Brill. 2007. http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/ebookviewer/ebook/nlebk_232448_AN?sid=af9caa8e-00c8- 4527-9df1-98612f250aac@sessionmgr198&vid=1&format=EB&lpid=lp_ix Fiction Writing: http://library.anu.edu.au/record=b3114739 Visual Arts: http://library.anu.edu.au/record=b3114745
6 Iran: Raising Voices: Women in Iranian Cinema Essential Reading: Hamid Naficy, 'Veiled Vision/Powerful Presences: Women in Post-revolutionary Iranian Cinema,' eds. Mahnaz Afkhami and Erika Friedl, In the Eye of The Storm: Women in Post-revolutionary Iran, New York: Syracuse University Press, 1994. pp. 131- 150. CD: "Iranian Women Filmmakers" documentary. http://www.iranchamber.com/cinema/articles/veiled_voice_vision_iranian_cinema2.php http://www.offscreen.com/index.php/phile/essays/women_of_iran/ Lahiji, Shahla, , Portrayal of Women in Iranian Cinema, http://www.iran-bulletin.org/art/CINEMA2.html Further Reading: Richard Tapper (ed.), The New Iranian Cinema, London; New York: I. B. Tauris, 2002. Film Directors: http://library.anu.edu.au/record=b3114740 http://www.irandokht.com/editorial/index4.php?area=pro&sectionID=8&editorialID=990 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9gJSEgHUaZI
7 Turkish Women and Nation This week, we will explore Turkish women’s historical and contemporary participation in nation-building through their cultural and political activism. Starting from late 19th century rise of Turkish nationalism to the current tensions between Islamic and secular ideals of femininity will be discussed. Required readings: Staudt, K. 2019, "(In)visible beauty queens: literary modernism and the politics of women’s Visibility in Nezihe Muhiddin’s Güzellik Kraliçesi", Feminist modernist studies, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 287-303. https://doi-org.virtual.anu.edu.au/10.1080/24692921.2019.1671039 Unal, D. 2015, "Vulnerable identities: Pious women columnists' narratives on Islamic feminism and feminist self-identification in contemporary Turkey", Women's Studies International Forum, vol. 53, pp. 12-21. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wsif.2015.08.003 Further readings: Adak, H. 2003, "National Myths and Self-Na(rra)tions: Mustafa Kemal's Nutuk and Halide Edib's Memoirs and The Turkish Ordeal", The South Atlantic quarterly, vol. 102, no. 2-3, pp. 509. https://muse-jhu-edu.virtual.anu.edu.au/article/43702 Altinay, A.G. 2004, The myth of the military nation: militarism, gender, and education in Turkey, Palgrave Macmillan, New York. Dursun, A. 2019, "Extending the 'private' sphere: conservative women's politics of charity in Turkey", Journal of Gender Studies, vol. 28, no. 8, pp. 948-959. https://doi-org.virtual.anu.edu.au/10.1080/09589236.2019.1653269
8 Intersectional Experiences and Empowerment of Women in Turkey Intersectional Experiences and Empowerment of Women in Turkey This week will focus on gender performance and empowerment more specifically from an intersectional point of view. Women’s experiences from different social classes, cultural and ethnic backgrounds will be discussed in order to unravel some of the complexities of women’s predicament in Turkey. Required readings: Alemdaroglu, A. 2015, "Escaping femininity, claiming respectability: Culture, class and young women in Turkey", Women's studies international forum, vol. 53, pp. 53-62. https://www-sciencedirect-com.virtual.anu.edu.au/science/article/pii/S0277539515001545 Schäfers, M. 2017, "Writing against loss: Kurdish women, subaltern authorship, and the politics of voice in contemporary Turkey", Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 543-561. https://doi-org.virtual.anu.edu.au/10.1111/1467-9655.12648 Further readings: Arat, Y. & Altinay, A.G. 2015, "KAMER, a women's center and an experiment in cultivating cosmopolitan norms", Women's Studies International Forum, vol. 49, pp. 12-19. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wsif.2015.01.001 Bespinar, F.U. 2010, "Questioning agency and empowerment: Women's work-related strategies and social class in urban Turkey", Women's studies international forum, vol. 33, no. 6, pp. 523-532. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wsif.2014.11.012 https://www-sciencedirect-com.virtual.anu.edu.au/science/article/pii/S0277539510001172 Ozkaleli, U. 2015, "State of the state in their minds: Intersectional framework for women's citizenship in Turkey", Women's Studies International Forum, vol. 48, pp. 93-102.
9 Women in The Levant: Conflict Resolution and Non-violent resistance This week will explore the position of women in conflict-ridden countries focusing on the particular case of Palestinian women and their non-violent resistance of Israeli occupation through cultural production and civic activism. It will also highly the rich contribution of Lebanese and Syrian feminist cultural producers in their resistance to sectarianism, oppression and patriarchy. Essential reading: Richter-Devroe, Sophie (2011) ‘ “Here, it’s not about conflict resolution – we can only resist”: Palestinian women’s activism in conflict-resolution and non-violent resistance’, in Nadje Al-Ali & Nicola Pratt (eds.) women & war in the Middle East, London & New York: Zed Books. Mikdashi, M. (2014). “Sex and sectarianism: The legal architecture of Lebanese citizenship”. Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, 34(2), 279-293. Alsaba, K. and Kapilashrami, A. “Understanding women’s experience of violence and the political economy of gender in conflict: the case of Syria” Journal of Reproductive Health Matters, 24:47, 5-17, 2016. Further Reading: Boswall, k. and Al Akash, R. “Listening, resistance and mobile phone playlists: musical listening practices of Syrian women living as refugees in Northern Jordan” in Journal of Social Dynamics, pp. 167-183 | Published online: 10 Nov 2017. R., Barghouti, F., & Mousa, J. (2010). Feminist Attitudes and Praxis Among Palestinian Women Activists. Feminist Formations, 22(3), 146-175. Helou. M. (2019). Who's your daddy: Why a feminist lens and praxis are necessary for the Lebanese revolution. Jadaliyya. Available at: https://www.jadaliyya.com/Details/40345/Who%E2%80%99s-Your-Daddy-Why-a-Feminist-Lens-and-Praxis-are-Necessary-for-the-Lebanese-Revolution Greenberg, E. (2009). ‘The King of the Streets’: Hip hop and the reclaiming of masculinity in Jerusalem’s Shu’afat Refugee camp. Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication, 2(2): pp. 231-250 Saadeh, L. (2018). The Israeli occupation and Palestinians’ right to choice in marriage. Kohl, 4(2), available at https://kohljournal.press/palestinians-choice-marriage Moghnieh, L. (n.d.). Diagnosing hysteria in Lebanon: Psychologizing women and gender. Available at: https://sawtalniswa.org/article/464 Saadeh, L. (2018). The Israeli occupation and Palestinians’ right to choice in marriage. Kohl, 4(2), available at https://kohljournal.press/palestinians-choice-marriage Alqaisiya, W. (2018). Decolonial queering: The politics of being queer in Palestine. Journal of Palestine Studies, 47(3). Allouche, S. (2019). Love, Lebanese style: Towards an either/and analytical framework of kinship. Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies, 15(2), 157-178. Allouche, S. (2019). Love, Lebanese style: Towards an either/and analytical framework of kinship. Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies, 15(2), 157-178. Deeb, L. & Harb, M. (2013). Leisurely Islam: Negotiating Geography and Morality in Shi’ite South Beirut. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Kanaaneh, R. (2002). Birthing the Nation: Strategies of Palestinian Women in Israel. Berkeley: University of California Press Yasmine, R. & Sukkar, B. (2018). In the pursuit of reproductive justice in Lebanon. Kohl, 4(2). Available at: https://kohljournal.press/pursuit-rj-lebanon Finn, A. (2018). Slowing it down: Embodied complicity and the challenges of feminist solidarity at the 2017 Beirut Workers’ Day March. Kohl, 4(1). Available at: https://kohljournal.press/slowing-it-down Benaz Somiry-Batrawi, ‘Echoes: Gender & Media Challenges’ in Palestine’ in Women and Media, in (Ed.) Naomi Sakr, IB Tauris, 2004, Ch 7, pp. 109-119. Lina Khatib, Filming the Modern Middle East: Politics in the Cinemas of Hollywood and the Arab World, IB Tauris, 2006, Ch 3, pp. 105-163. Feminist Struggles in Egypt Victoria Firmo-Fontan, ‘Power, NGOs & Lebanese Television: A Case Study of Al- Manar TV & the and Media in the Middle East: Power Through Self Expression, (Ed.) Naomi Sakr, IB Tauris, 2004, Ch 10, pp. 162-179. Miriam Cooke , War’s Other Voices: Women Writers on the Lebanese Civil War, Cambridge Uni Press, 1988, Ch 4, e-book http://books.google.com.au/books?hl=en&lr=&id=5NJfRNeS1EYC&oi=fnd&pg=PR7&dq=l ebanese+women+%2B+film&ots=hXX02lCvrQ&sig=IXDmHOGCh_VIf3bdYUT- mx4fcxA#v=onepage&q=lebanese%20women%20%2B%20film&f=false Abdul-Hadi, Rabab. (1998) ‘Palestinian women's autonomous movement: Emergence, dynamics and challenges’, in Gender and Society 12(6): 649-673 Ghiwa Sayegh. "We Raise Fists, They Shake Fingers: Remembering Feminist Revolutions". Kohl: a Journal for Body and Gender Research Vol. 5 No. 3 (18 December 2019): pp. 1-1. Available at: https://kohljournal.press/we-raise-fists
10 Feminist Struggles in Egypt: Neo-liberalism, Sexuality and Masculinity Feminist Struggles in Egypt: Neo-liberalism, Sexuality and Masculinity In this session, we explore the changes in Feminist struggles in Egypt given the repercussions on the neo-liberal economic model on social structures, gendered relations of power and emerging new forms of masculinity. We explore how socio-economic and political anxieties have played an instrumental role in the shaping of hegemonic norms of masculinity and how do cultural expressions shape and are shaped by these changes. Essential Reading: Pahwa, S. “Politics of the Digital Boudoir: Sentimentality and the Transformation of Civil Debate in Egyptian Women’s Blogs” in Freedom without Permission: Bodies and Space in the Arab Revolutions. Eds. Hasso, F and Salime, Z. Duke University Press 2016. Kreil, A. (2016). “Territories of desire: A geography of competing intimacies in Cairo”. Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies, 12(2), 166-180. Mecky, M. (2018). “State policing: Moral panics and masculinity in post-2011 Egypt”. Kohl, 4(1), available at: https://kohljournal.press/state-policing Optional Extra Essential Reading: Nossery, N. “Women, Art, and Revolution in the Streets of Egypt” in ed. Siddiqi, F. Women’s Movements in Post-“Arab Spring” North Africa. Palgrave 2016. Khattab, M. “The Struggle of Egyptian Women for Equal Rights Continues: Two Steps Forward, One Step Backward”. ed. Siddiqi, F. Women’s Movements in Post-“Arab Spring” North Africa. Palgrave 2016. Further Reading: Abdelmonem, A. (2015). Reconceptualizing sexual harassment in Egypt: A Longitudinal assessment of el-Taharrush el-Ginsy in Arabic online forums and anti-sexual harassment activism. Kohl, 1(1), available at: https://kohljournal.press/reconceptualizing-sexual-harassment-in-egypt Mourad, S. (2013). The naked body of Alia: Gender, citizenship, and the Egyptian body politic. Journal of Communication Inquiry, 38(1), 62-78. Pratt, N. (2007). The Queen Boat case in Egypt: Sexuality, national security and state sovereignty. Review of International Studies, 33, 129-144 (included in readings folder). Baron, B. (2006). Women, honor, and the state: Evidence from Egypt. Middle Eastern Studies, 42(1), 1-20. Ghannam, F. (2013). Live and Die Like a Man: Gender Dynamics in Urban Egypt. Stanford: Stanford University Press. Ismail, S. (2006). Political Life in Cairo’s New Quarters: Encountering the Everyday State. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press Inhorn, M. (2012). The New Arab Man: Emergent Masculinities, Technologies, and Islam in the Middle East. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Lina Khatib, ‘The Orient and its Others: Women as Tools of Nationalism in Egyptian Political Cinema’ in Women and Media in the Middle East: Power Through Self Expression, (Ed.) Naomi Sakr, IB Tauris, 2004, Ch 5, pp. 72-88. Baron, B. (2005). Egypt as Woman: Nationalism, Gender, and Politics. Berkeley: University of California Press Mansour, L. (2018). ICTs as the bullring: A case study of the rainbow flag incident in Cairo. Kohl, 4(1). Available at https://kohljournal.press/icts-as-the-bullring Wesley D. Buskirk: Egyptian Film and Feminsim: Egypt’s View of Women Through Cinema, Cinesthesia. Karin van Nieuwkerk, A Trade like Any Other: Female Singers and Dancers, University of Texas Press 1985, chapters 4 and 6.Najde Al-Ali, Secularism, Gender and the State in the Middle East: The Egyptian Women’s Movement, Cambridge University Press, 2000. Earl L. Sullivan, Women in Egyptian Public Life, Syracuse University Press 1986, 21-38. Bier, L. (2011). Revolutionary Womanhood: Feminisms, Modernity, and the State in Nasser’s Egypt. Stanford: Stanford University Press Al-Ali, N. (2000). Secularism, Gender and the State in the Middle East: The Egyptian Women’s Movement. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
11 Women in the Gulf States: Between State’s Feminism and Feminist Resistance In this session, we explore the explosion of Feminist cultural production in the Gulf States and how they resist the top-down Feminist agenda of their states and pursue other venues for their quest for non-tokenistic gender equality. Essential Reading: Laachir, K: “Saudi Women Novelists and the Quest for Freedom: Raja Alem’s The Doves’ Necklace”. In: Laachir, K and Talajooy, S, Resistance in Contemporary Middle Eastern Cultures: Literature, Cinema and Music. Routledge: 2013. Hasso, F. “The Sect-Sex-Police Nexus & Politics in Bahrain Pearl Revolution” in Freedom without Permission: Bodies and Space in the Arab Revolutions. Eds. Hasso, F and Salime, Z. Duke University Press 2016. Ali, Z. (2018). “Women’s political activism in Iraq: Caught between NGOization and the struggle for a civil state”. International Journal of Contemporary Iraqi Studies, 12(1), pp. 35-51 (included in readings folder). Further Reading: Abdulkarim, N. (2012). Saudi Feminism: Between mama Amreeka and baba Abdullah. Jadaliyya. Available at: https://www.jadaliyya.com/Details/25926/Saudi-Feminism-Between-Mama-Amreeka-and-Baba-Abdullah Galan, S. “Cautions Enactments: Interstitial Spaces of Gender Politics in Saudi Arabia” in Freedom without Permission: Bodies and Space in the Arab Revolutions. Eds. Hasso, F and Salime, Z. Duke University Press 2016. Kherfi, Y. (2019). Female hysteria, invisibilized labor, and the Kafala system. Kohl, 5(2). Available at: https://kohljournal.press/female-hysteria Al-Ali, Nadje (2016) 'Sexual violence in Iraq: Challenges for transnational feminist politics.' European Journal of Women’s Studies. pp. 1-18. Menoret, P. (2014). Joyriding in Riyadh: Oil, Urbanism, and Road Revolt. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Sukarieh, M. (2015). The first lady phenomenon: Elites, states, and the contradictory politics of women’s empowerment in the neoliberal Arab world. Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, 35(3): 575-587. Nadje Al-Ali & Nicola Pratt (ed.) Women & War in the Middle East: London ; New York: Zed Books, 2009. http://reader.eblib.com.au.virtual.anu.edu.au/(S(a3mgvp3frvjcherrfqifuuwa))/Reader.aspx?p= 474790&o=200&u=y%2fpCRWRzbcm4LvNIBZgEig%3d%3d&t=1374035188&h=BA1B00 D20E6E94D1158D8F4A995D9956ECA0F47A&s=9215317&ut=639&pg=1&r=img&c=- 1&pat=n# Nadje Al-Ali, Iraqi Women: Untold Stories from 1948 to the Present, Zed Books, 2007. Rebecca Hillauer, Encyclopedia of Arab Women Filmmakers, Cairo, The American University in Cairo Press, 117-129. Nadje Al-Ali & Nicola Pratt (ed.), What Kind of Liberation? California, University of California Press, 2009. Al-Ali, Nadje (2012b) 'The Iraqi Women's Movement: Past and Contemporary Perspectives.' In: Arenfeldt, Pernille and Golley, Nawar, (eds.), Mapping Arab Women's Movements: A Century of Transformations Within. Cairo: AUC Press, pp. 93-110. Marwan Kraidy, Reality Television and Arab Politics: Contention in Public Life, Cambridge University Press, 2010, pp, 119-143. Ahmad Fakhro, Women at work in the Gulf: A case study of Bahrain, Kegan Paul International, 1990. Madawi Al-Rasheed, A Most Masculine: Gender, Politics and Religion in Saudi Arabia, Cambridge University Press, 2013, pp 212-243. Mona Al-Munajjed, Women in Saudi Arabia Today, St. Martin’s Press 1997.
12 Maghrebi Feminism: Reshaping Debates on Gender in the Arab World Maghrebi feminist movements have been at the forefront of feminist struggles in the Arab world and have made significant gains. In this session, we explore post-Arab Uprisings feminist agendas in the region and the way feminist cultural producers maintain their pressure for equality. Essential Reading Benyoussef, L. “Gender and the Fractured Mythscapes of National Identity in Revolutionary Tunisia” in Freedom without Permission: Bodies and Space in the Arab Revolutions. Eds. Hasso, F and Salime, Z. Duke University Press 2016. Siddiqi, F. “The Center: A Post-revolution Space for Women’s Movements in North Africa: Morocco as an Example” in ed. Siddiqi, F. Women’s Movements in Post-“Arab Spring” North Africa. Palgrave 2016. Tlemçani, R. “The Algerian Woman Issue: Struggles, Islamic Violence, and Co-optation” ed. Siddiqi, F. Women’s Movements in Post-“Arab Spring” North Africa. Palgrave 2016. Further Reading Rogers, A. “Revolutionary Nuns or Totalitarian Pawns: Evaluating Libyan State Feminism After Mu’ammar al-Gaddafi” ed. Siddiqi, F. Women’s Movements in Post-“Arab Spring” North Africa. Palgrave 2016. Labidi, L. “Tunisian Women’s Literature and the Critique of Authority: Sources, Contexts, and the Tunisian “Arab Spring”” ed. Siddiqi, F. Women’s Movements in Post-“Arab Spring” North Africa. Palgrave 2016. Boutkhil, S. “Moroccan Women in Limbo: On Liminal Citizenship and the Quest for Equality.” ed. Siddiqi, F. Women’s Movements in Post-“Arab Spring” North Africa. Palgrave 2016. Siddiqi, F. Women’s Movements in Post-“Arab Spring” North Africa. Palgrave 2016. Boutkhil, Soumia Salime, Z. (2012). “Signs of new feminism? Promises of Morocco's February 20”. Jadaliyya. Available at: https://www.jadaliyya.com/Details/27569/Signs-of-New-Feminism-Promises-of-Morocco%60s-February-20 Kerkech, R. “Moroccan Women’s Cultural Rights: A Psycho-social Perspective on Cultural Paradoxes” ed. Siddiqi, F. Women’s Movements in Post-“Arab Spring” North Africa. Palgrave 2016. Meha Jouini. "Feminism and the revolutions of our regions: How did feminism turn into a stigma? | Tunisia". Kohl: a Journal for Body and Gender Research Vol. 5 No. 3 (18 December 2019): pp. 7-7. Available at: https://kohljournal.press/feminism-turned-stigma Seghaier, R. (2018). Policing women’s sexualities and getting credit for it: Sex work and the Tunisian state. Kohl, 4(1). Available at: https://kohljournal.press/sex-work-and-the-tunisian-state Schade-Poulsen, M. (1999). Men and Popular Music in Algeria: The Social Significance of Rai. Austin: University of Texas Press. Evrard, A. Y. (2014). The Moroccan Women’s Rights Movement. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press. Khalil, Andrea (2014) ‘Tunisia’s women: partners in revolution’, in The Journal of North African Studies. 19:2: 186-199.

Assessment Summary

Assessment task Value Due Date Learning Outcomes
Class Participation 10 % * 1,2 and 4
Essay 1 3000 word 40 % 10/09/2021 1,2,3 and 4
essay 2 4000 word 50 % 22/10/2021 1,2,3 and 4

* If the Due Date and Return of Assessment date are blank, see the Assessment Tab for specific Assessment Task details

Policies

ANU has educational policies, procedures and guidelines, which are designed to ensure that staff and students are aware of the University’s academic standards, and implement them. Students are expected to have read the Academic Misconduct Rule before the commencement of their course. Other key policies and guidelines include:

Assessment Requirements

The ANU is using Turnitin to enhance student citation and referencing techniques, and to assess assignment submissions as a component of the University's approach to managing Academic Integrity. For additional information regarding Turnitin please visit the Academic Integrity . In rare cases where online submission using Turnitin software is not technically possible; or where not using Turnitin software has been justified by the Course Convener and approved by the Associate Dean (Education) on the basis of the teaching model being employed; students shall submit assessment online via ‘Wattle’ outside of Turnitin, or failing that in hard copy, or through a combination of submission methods as approved by the Associate Dean (Education). The submission method is detailed below.

Moderation of Assessment

Marks that are allocated during Semester are to be considered provisional until formalised by the College examiners meeting at the end of each Semester. If appropriate, some moderation of marks might be applied prior to final results being released.

Assessment Task 1

Value: 10 %
Learning Outcomes: 1,2 and 4

Class Participation

Students will be assessed based on their ability to express perspectives and to draw conclusions from lectures and reading material. Participation is important for the cross-fertilisation of ideas and also to encourage both independence of thought and clarity of expression.

Assessment Task 2

Value: 40 %
Due Date: 10/09/2021
Learning Outcomes: 1,2,3 and 4

Essay 1 3000 word

The essay tests students’ ability to research a topic and to present a quality, cogent argument in response to the question. Questions are based on the material covered in the course and in relation to the student’s area of interest. Essays are marked against criteria that include how directly the question is answered, the cogency with which an argument is presented and framed, the depth of research, and technical quality.   

Assessment Task 3

Value: 50 %
Due Date: 22/10/2021
Learning Outcomes: 1,2,3 and 4

essay 2 4000 word

The essay tests students’ ability to research a topic and to present a quality, cogent argument in response to the question. Questions are based on the material covered in the course and in relation to the student’s area of interest. Essays are marked against criteria that include how directly the question is answered, the cogency with which an argument is presented and framed, the depth of research, and technical quality.

Academic Integrity

Academic integrity is a core part of the ANU culture as a community of scholars. At its heart, academic integrity is about behaving ethically, committing to honest and responsible scholarly practice and upholding these values with respect and fairness.


The ANU commits to assisting all members of our community to understand how to engage in academic work in ways that are consistent with, and actively support academic integrity. The ANU expects staff and students to be familiar with the academic integrity principle and Academic Misconduct Rule, uphold high standards of academic integrity and act ethically and honestly, to ensure the quality and value of the qualification that you will graduate with.


The Academic Misconduct Rule is in place to promote academic integrity and manage academic misconduct. Very minor breaches of the academic integrity principle may result in a reduction of marks of up to 10% of the total marks available for the assessment. The ANU offers a number of online and in person services to assist students with their assignments, examinations, and other learning activities. Visit the Academic Skills website for more information about academic integrity, your responsibilities and for assistance with your assignments, writing skills and study.

Online Submission

You will be required to electronically sign a declaration as part of the submission of your assignment. Please keep a copy of the assignment for your records. Unless an exemption has been approved by the Associate Dean (Education) submission must be through Turnitin.

Hardcopy Submission

For some forms of assessment (hand written assignments, art works, laboratory notes, etc.) hard copy submission is appropriate when approved by the Associate Dean (Education). Hard copy submissions must utilise the Assignment Cover Sheet. Please keep a copy of tasks completed for your records.

Late Submission

Individual assessment tasks may or may not allow for late submission. Policy regarding late submission is detailed below:

  • Late submission not permitted. If submission of assessment tasks without an extension after the due date is not permitted, a mark of 0 will be awarded.
  • Late submission permitted. Late submission of assessment tasks without an extension are penalised at the rate of 5% of the possible marks available per working day or part thereof. Late submission of assessment tasks is not accepted after 10 working days after the due date, or on or after the date specified in the course outline for the return of the assessment item. Late submission is not accepted for take-home examinations.

Referencing Requirements

Accepted academic practice for referencing sources that you use in presentations can be found via the links on the Wattle site, under the file named “ANU and College Policies, Program Information, Student Support Services and Assessment”. Alternatively, you can seek help through the Students Learning Development website.

Extensions and Penalties

Extensions and late submission of assessment pieces are covered by the Student Assessment (Coursework) Policy and Procedure. Extensions may be granted for assessment pieces that are not examinations or take-home examinations. If you need an extension, you must request an extension in writing on or before the due date. If you have documented and appropriate medical evidence that demonstrates you were not able to request an extension on or before the due date, you may be able to request it after the due date.

Privacy Notice

The ANU has made a number of third party, online, databases available for students to use. Use of each online database is conditional on student end users first agreeing to the database licensor’s terms of service and/or privacy policy. Students should read these carefully. In some cases student end users will be required to register an account with the database licensor and submit personal information, including their: first name; last name; ANU email address; and other information.
In cases where student end users are asked to submit ‘content’ to a database, such as an assignment or short answers, the database licensor may only use the student’s ‘content’ in accordance with the terms of service – including any (copyright) licence the student grants to the database licensor. Any personal information or content a student submits may be stored by the licensor, potentially offshore, and will be used to process the database service in accordance with the licensors terms of service and/or privacy policy.
If any student chooses not to agree to the database licensor’s terms of service or privacy policy, the student will not be able to access and use the database. In these circumstances students should contact their lecturer to enquire about alternative arrangements that are available.

Distribution of grades policy

Academic Quality Assurance Committee monitors the performance of students, including attrition, further study and employment rates and grade distribution, and College reports on quality assurance processes for assessment activities, including alignment with national and international disciplinary and interdisciplinary standards, as well as qualification type learning outcomes.

Since first semester 1994, ANU uses a grading scale for all courses. This grading scale is used by all academic areas of the University.

Support for students

The University offers students support through several different services. You may contact the services listed below directly or seek advice from your Course Convener, Student Administrators, or your College and Course representatives (if applicable).

Dr Karima Laachir
u5105717@anu.edu.au

Research Interests


Dr Karima Laachir

By Appointment
By Appointment
Dr Karima Laachir
02 61254982
Karima.Laachir@anu.edu.au

Research Interests


Dr Karima Laachir

By Appointment
By Appointment

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