• Offered by School of Archaeology and Anthropology
  • ANU College ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences
  • Course subject Biological Anthropology
  • Areas of interest Anthropology, Archaeology, Biological Anthropology, Biology

All primates (non-human and human) have the capacity for flexible biological responses to environmental change. Due to the wide range of environments in which primate species are found this flexibility often results in extreme adaptability in diet and food intake. This course looks at this dietary flexibility and how it may impact or limit nutritional intake across time and space and in turn how this may impact issues of health and population viability. Using both cross-species and cross-cultural comparative approaches this course will specifically explore how nutrition relates to disease dynamics and health in various physical environments across all primates, both extinct and extant. The main sections of the course will include exploring the adequacy of different diets, issues of both malnutrition and overnutrition, and the impact of nutrition for reproduction and growth in both juvenile and adolescent periods. It will also consider how changing environments alter nutritional intakes to potentially impact population health in new ways. Finally, it will consider the methodological challenges of studying nutrition in living or dead primates (human and non- human) to highlight how this may affect our interpretations of the relationships we discuss throughout the course.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills to:
  1. Demonstrate the ability to identify key facts and commonalities between concepts relating to nutrition and disease;
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of fundamental concepts in nutrition, epidemiology and  adaptability through the use of cross species and cross cultural comparisons;
  3. Understand basic principals from current research papers in subjects relevant to nutrition and disease and evaluate the effectiveness of the methods and theories used;
  4. Use a selective case study approach to explain a topic or argument in the field orally, in a clear, concise, analytical and evidence-based manner; and
  5. Draw together material from a range of scholarly sources relevant to a topic in the field, to form a unified text which sets out an independent and, where appropriate, critical assessment of that material.

Indicative Assessment

One 500 word Essay proposal (5%) (LO 1,2,5)
One 2000 word essay (30%) (LO 1,2,5)
One 30 minute Tutorial presentation (in groups of 2) (15%) (LO 4)
Four 300 word Tutorial portfolio assignments (5% each x 4 = 20%) (LO 3)
Two x 45 minute midterm exams (15% each x 2 = 30%) (LO 1,2)

The ANU uses Turnitin to enhance student citation and referencing techniques, and to assess assignment submissions as a component of the University's approach to managing Academic Integrity. While the use of Turnitin is not mandatory, the ANU highly recommends Turnitin is used by both teaching staff and students. For additional information regarding Turnitin please visit the ANU Online website.

Workload

130 hours of total student learning time made up from:
a) 36 hours of contact over 12 weeks: 24 hours of lectures and 12 hours of tutorials and tutorial-like activities; and
b) 94 hours of independent student research, reading, and writing.

Requisite and Incompatibility

12 units of 1000-level ANTH, ARCH, BIAN or BIOL courses. Incompatible with BIAN6119

Preliminary Reading

Harrison, G., Tanner, J., Pilbeam, D. and Baker, P. Human Biology, Part IV, 3rd edn, Oxford UP, 1988.
Ashcroft, F. Life at the Extremes, Harper Collins, 2000.
McMichael, T. Human Frontiers, Environments and Disease, Cambridge UP, 2001.

Fees

Tuition fees are for the academic year indicated at the top of the page.  

Commonwealth Support (CSP) Students
If you have been offered a Commonwealth supported place, your fees are set by the Australian Government for each course. At ANU 1 EFTSL is 48 units (normally 8 x 6-unit courses). More information about your student contribution amount for each course at Fees

Student Contribution Band:
2
Unit value:
6 units

If you are a domestic graduate coursework student with a Domestic Tuition Fee (DTF) place or international student you will be required to pay course tuition fees (see below). Course tuition fees are indexed annually. Further information for domestic and international students about tuition and other fees can be found at Fees.

Where there is a unit range displayed for this course, not all unit options below may be available.

Units EFTSL
6.00 0.12500
Domestic fee paying students
Year Fee
2023 $4320
International fee paying students
Year Fee
2023 $6180
Note: Please note that fee information is for current year only.

Offerings, Dates and Class Summary Links

ANU utilises MyTimetable to enable students to view the timetable for their enrolled courses, browse, then self-allocate to small teaching activities / tutorials so they can better plan their time. Find out more on the Timetable webpage.

The list of offerings for future years is indicative only.
Class summaries, if available, can be accessed by clicking on the View link for the relevant class number.

First Semester

Class number Class start date Last day to enrol Census date Class end date Mode Of Delivery Class Summary
4392 20 Feb 2023 27 Feb 2023 31 Mar 2023 26 May 2023 In Person N/A

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