single degree

Master of Anthropology and Planetary Futures

A single one year graduate award offered by the School of Archaeology and Anthropology

MAPF
  • Length 1 year full-time
  • Minimum 48 Units
  • Academic plan MAPF
  • Post Nominal MAnth
  • CRICOS code 114811F
  • Mode of delivery
    • Multi-Modal
  • Field of Education
    • Anthropology
  • Academic contact
  • Length 1 year full-time
  • Minimum 48 Units
  • Academic plan MAPF
  • Post Nominal MAnth
  • CRICOS code 114811F
  • Mode of delivery
    • Multi-Modal
  • Field of Education
    • Anthropology
  • Academic contact

Program Requirements

The Master of Anthropology and Planetary Future requires completion of 48 units, which must include:



24 units of core courses 

Foundation course

ANTH8061 Anthropology and Planetary Futures (6 units)


Anthropological Theory - Complete 6 units from the following list:

ANTH8062 Ethnography and Theory (6 units) 

BIAN8005 Theory Seminar in Biological Anthropology (6 units)

 

Capstone methodology course:

ANTH8059 Doing Ethnography (6 units)


Foundations for Social Research - Complete 6 units from the following list:

ANTH8001 Ethnography and Research Ethics Pro-Seminar (6 units)

BIAN6019 Data Analysis and Methods in Biological Anthropology and Archaeology (6 units)


24 units from the following thematic course lists - Anthropology for a troubled planet:

Human/Other than Human Relations

ANTH8063 Special Topics in Anthropology and Planetary Futures (may be completed up to two times on different topics) (6 units)

CHMD8014 Perspectives on Culture, Health and Medicine (6 units)

GEND6501 Posthuman Bodies (6 units)

SOCY8006 Health Inequalities (6 units)


Anthropology of Development, Conflict, and Inequality

ASIA6039 Burma/Myanmar – a Country in Crisis (6 units)

ANTH8007 Key Concepts Anthropology of Development (6 units)

ANTH8056 Introduction to Humanitarian Action (6 units)

ASIA8050 Social Conflict and Environmental Challenges in Asia and the Pacific (6 units)


Social Activism, Indigenous Cultures, and Political Transformation

ANTH8125 Indigenous Worlds: Challenges of Emergence, Recognition, and Futurity (6 units)

ASIA8023 Race, Culture, and Asian Body in the Age of Biotech (6 units)

ASIA8038 Cultural Creativity and Research in Asia and the Pacific (6 units)

INDG8001 Indigenous Peoples and Development in Australia: Principles and Practices for Indigenous-led Change (6 units)

INDG8004 First Nations Peoples and Public Policy in Australia (6 units)


Anthropology, Risk, and Resources

ANTH8047 Land Rights and Resource Development (6 units)

ASIA8048 Disasters and Epidemics in Asia and Pacific (6 units)

ASIA6118 Pollution in Past Societies: The Science and History that Shaped the Modern World

EMDV8017 Toxic: Pollution and Waste (6 units)

EMDV8082 Food Wars: Food Security and Agricultural Policy (6 units)

EMDV8103 Impact: Assessing Environment, Resource and Development Projects (6 units)

EMDV8124 Disaster Risk Management (6 units)


Field schools and internships

ANTH6065 Indonesia Field School (6 units)

ENVS6017 Vietnam Field School (6 units)

PASI6005 Pacific Islands Field School (6 units)

Capstone Courses

[ANTH8059]

Admission Requirements

Applicants must present one of the following:

  • A cognate Bachelor degree or international equivalent with a minimum GPA of 5/7
  • A Bachelor degree or international equivalent AND a Graduate Certificate or Graduate Diploma in a cognate discipline with a minimum GPA of 4/7

The GPA for a Bachelor program will be calculated from (i) a completed Bachelor degree using all grades and/or (ii) a completed Bachelor degree using all grades other than those from the last semester (or equivalent study period) of the Bachelor degree. The higher of the two calculations will be used as the basis for admission.

Cognate Disciplines: Anthropology, Cultural Heritage Studies, Development Studies, History, Human Ecology, Human Geography, Indigenous Studies, International Relations, Linguistics, Literary Studies, Philosophy, Political Science, Sociology

Ranking and English Language proficiency: At a minimum, all applicants must meet program-specific academic/non-academic requirements, and English language requirements. Admission to most ANU programs is on a competitive basis. Therefore, meeting all admission requirements does not automatically guarantee entry. In line with the University's admissions policy and strategic plan, an assessment for admission may include competitively ranking applicants on the basis of specific academic achievement, English language proficiency and diversity factors. Applicants will first be ranked on a GPA ('GPA1') that is calculated using all but the last semester (or equivalent) of the Bachelor degree used for admission purposes. If required, ranking may further be confirmed on the basis of:

  • a GPA ('GPA2') calculated on the penultimate and antepenultimate semesters (or equivalent) of the Bachelor degree used for admission purposes; and/or
  • demonstrating higher-level English language proficiency

Prior to enrolment in this ANU program, all students who gain entry will have their Bachelor degree reassessed, to confirm minimum requirements were met.

Further information: English language admission requirements and post-admission support

Diversity factors: As Australia’s national university, ANU is global representative of Australian research and education. ANU endeavours to recruit and maintain a diverse and deliberate student cohort representative not only of Australia, but the world. In order to achieve these outcomes, competitive ranking of applicants may be adjusted to ensure access to ANU is a reality for brilliant students from countries across the globe.

Assessment of qualifications: Unless otherwise indicated, ANU will accept all Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) qualifications or international equivalents that meet or exceed the published admission requirements of our programs, provided all other admission requirements are also met.

Where an applicant has more than one completed tertiary qualification, ANU will base assessment on the qualification that best meets the admission requirements for the program. Find out more about the Australian Qualifications Framework: www.aqf.edu.au.

Unless otherwise indicated, where an applicant has more than one completed tertiary qualification, ANU will calculate the GPA for each qualification separately. ANU will base assessment on the best GPA of all completed tertiary qualifications of the same level or higher.

ANU uses a 7-point Grade Point Average (GPA) scale. All qualifications submitted for admission at ANU will be converted to this common scale, which will determine if an applicant meets our published admission requirements. Find out more about how a 7-point GPA is calculated for Australian universities: www.uac.edu.au/future-applicants/admission-criteria/tertiary-qualifications.

Alternate Admin Requirements

A cognate Bachelor degree or international equivalent with a minimum GPA of 5/7

A Bachelor degree or international equivalent AND a Graduate Certificate or Graduate Diploma in a cognate discipline with a minimum GPA of 4/7

All applicants must meet the University’s English Language Admission Requirements for Students

Cognate Disciplines

Anthropology, Cultural Heritage Studies, Development Studies, History, Human Ecology, Human Geography, Indigenous Studies, Sociology

Domestic Tuition Fees (DTF)

For more information see: http://www.anu.edu.au/students/program-administration/costs-fees

Annual indicative fee for international students
$50,500.00

For further information on International Tuition Fees see: https://www.anu.edu.au/students/program-administration/fees-payments/international-tuition-fees

Fee Information

All students are required to pay the Services and amenities fee (SA Fee)@

The annual indicative fee provides an estimate of the program tuition fees for international students and domestic students (where applicable). The annual indicative fee for a program is based on the standard full-time enrolment load of 48 units per year (unless the program duration is less than 48 units). Fees for courses vary by discipline meaning that the fees for a program can vary depending on the courses selected. Course fees are reviewed on an annual basis and typically will increase from year to year. The tuition fees payable are dependent on the year of commencement and the courses selected and are subject to increase during the period of study.

For further information on Fees and Payment please see: https://www.anu.edu.au/students/program-administration/fees-payments

Scholarships

ANU offers a wide range of scholarships to students to assist with the cost of their studies.@

Eligibility to apply for ANU scholarships varies depending on the specifics of the scholarship and can be categorised by the type of student you are.  Specific scholarship application process information is included in the relevant scholarship listing.

For further information see the Scholarships website.

Anthropology for a Future Planet

This program provides a humanities and social science lens to understand overlapping threats to social, ecological, political, economic, and health systems. It offers Australia’s only combined biological and cultural approach to grasp these planetary scale problems while foregrounding anthropology’s unique ethnographic method, which centres grounded and people-focused perspectives and values.


Anthropology equips students with skills, case studies, theories, and tools for social engagement to grasp our planetary crises, understand their cultural histories, and fight for a better future. The Master of Anthropology and Planetary Futures engages critical social thought and research methods to step back from crisis-thinking to consider the political and social work that these threats justify and enable, and provides evidence bases for advocacy and public debate. The degree equips students to describe and theorise how planetary emergencies came about precisely due to human social engineering and the dominance of particular sets of cultural values, while also recognising that they are shaped by the creative responses of people responding to rapid transformations on their own terms.


Why study Anthropology at the ANU?

The Master of Anthropology and Planetary Futures emphasises rigour in research methodologies to develop key analytical skills for systems thinking alongside cutting edge qualitative, fieldwork-based, and applied skills that provide solid empirical and critical foundations for future research careers. Training in methods from biological anthropology is combined with cultural anthropology’s ethnographic exploration of human diversity. Together, these research-led frameworks and applied anthropology provide unexpected and badly needed alternatives.

Career Options

ANU ranks among the world's very finest universities. Our nearly 100,000 alumni include political, business, government, and academic leaders around the world.

We have graduated remarkable people from every part of our continent, our region and all walks of life.

Employment Opportunities

Anthropology is the study of contemporary human cultural lives. In a globalised world, cross-cultural literacy and analysis have never been more important. The Master in Anthropology and Planetary Futures is a highly sought-after program that places very strong emphasis on anthropological theory and methods with the intention of equipping graduates with the skills for work in applied research contexts in the public and corporate sectors.


A Master of Anthropology and Planetary Futures will advance your career working in cultural institutions, the public service, non-government organisations, academia, or any professional area requiring an understanding of cross-cultural analysis.

Learning Outcomes

  1. analyse and engage the cutting edge of anthropological theories and ethnographic methods, and apply them to key global challenges and events;
  2. design and execute engaged and ethical anthropological research;
  3. understand the social basis and effects of planetary crises, as well as how our particular thinking and responses to crises emerges; and
  4. translate anthropological insights into social justice activism to address urgent social and planetary problems.

Further Information

To transfer to the VAPF - Master of Anthropology and Planetary Futures (Advanced) program, students must achieve a Distinction grade in Foundations for Social Research – at least 6 units and have confirmed appropriate supervision through an Expression of Interest (EOI) proposal to the anthropology faculty.

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