• Offered by School of Literature, Languages and Linguistics
  • ANU College ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences
  • Course subject English
  • Areas of interest Cultural Studies, Drama, English, Language Studies, Film
  • Academic career UGRD
  • Course convener
    • Dr Ian Higgins
  • Mode of delivery Online or In Person
  • Co-taught Course
  • Offered in First Semester 2020
    See Future Offerings

There are many different ways to ‘read’ texts. Some of the most exciting contemporary debates concern not just what to read, but how and why. In the process, the meanings of ‘reading’ and ‘text’ have been thrown wide open, and these meanings have ramifications for research writing. What does it mean to ‘read’  20,000 novels using an electronic database? Can we ‘read’ performing bodies, or emotions, ‘as if’ they were texts?

This course seeks to introduce students to a range of current theories and methods in humanities scholarship, with a particular focus on literary and cultural studies, drama and creative writing. Although it builds on skills and knowledge students will have developed through their undergraduate study, this course begins with an introductory or ‘refresher’ segment which provides an overview of the major developments in literary criticism and theory over the course of the twentieth century, including humanism, formalism, structuralism and post-structuralism, Marxism, feminism, psychoanalysis, historicism and postcolonialism. Informed by this foundation, students will examine in turn 3 or 4 current topics in literary and cultural studies, each running over 2-3 weeks and paired with a primary text (a novel, play, film, case study etc.). Topics might include: new theories of reading, such as ‘distant reading’, ‘surface reading’, ‘reparative reading’ etc.; animal studies; ecocriticism; theories of performance; practice-led research; theories of affect and emotion; trauma studies; memory studies; neuroscience and ‘plasticity’; each taught by scholars focusing on these areas.

The course will not provide a comprehensive overview, but an exciting and varied sample of current debates. Its aim is to stimulate students to think of reading as a creative process, and of research writing as itself a form of creative reading.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

Upon Successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Understand and critically evaluate the influence of a range of intellectual developments on the theory and practice of the discipline of literary and cultural studies, drama and creative writing.
  2. Understand the key elements of a range of different theoretical approaches and apply these approaches to specific examples.
  3. Identify, contextualize and critically evaluate which critical approaches and scholarly debates are best suited to particular research projects, or that will best enable sophisticated analysis of particular kinds of ‘texts’.

Indicative Assessment

Oral presentation: 10 minutes 10% (LO 1, 2, 3)

Essay on the same topic as oral presentation: 2000 words 40% (LO 1, 2, 3)

Essay that analyses one of the set primary text/s (in terms of one of the theoretical approaches or models set for class discussion): 3000 words 50% (LO 1, 2, 3)

The ANU uses Turnitin to enhance student citation and referencing techniques, and to assess assignment submissions as a component of the University's approach to managing Academic Integrity. While the use of Turnitin is not mandatory, the ANU highly recommends Turnitin is used by both teaching staff and students. For additional information regarding Turnitin please visit the ANU Online website.

Workload

130 hours of total student learning time made up from: a) 24 hours of contact over 12 weeks: 24 hours of seminars; b) 106 hours of independent student research, reading and writing.

Requisite and Incompatibility

To enrol in this course you must be studying a Bachelor of Arts Honours (HARTS or HART2), Bachelor of Languages Honours (HLANG) or Bachelor of Asian Studies Honours (HASIA), or completion of 144 units towards the Bachelor of Philosophy (Arts) (APHAR or APNAR). Incompatible with ENGL8021.

Prescribed Texts

Readings will change according to topics offered.



Assumed Knowledge

Completion of a cognate major.


Specialisations

Fees

Tuition fees are for the academic year indicated at the top of the page.  

If you are a domestic graduate coursework or international student you will be required to pay tuition fees. Tuition fees are indexed annually. Further information for domestic and international students about tuition and other fees can be found at Fees.

Student Contribution Band:
1
Unit value:
6 units

If you are an undergraduate student and have been offered a Commonwealth supported place, your fees are set by the Australian Government for each course. At ANU 1 EFTSL is 48 units (normally 8 x 6-unit courses). You can find your student contribution amount for each course at Fees.  Where there is a unit range displayed for this course, not all unit options below may be available.

Units EFTSL
6.00 0.12500
Domestic fee paying students
Year Fee
2020 $3120
International fee paying students
Year Fee
2020 $4800
Note: Please note that fee information is for current year only.

Offerings, Dates and Class Summary Links

The list of offerings for future years is indicative only.
Class summaries, if available, can be accessed by clicking on the View link for the relevant class number.

First Semester

Class number Class start date Last day to enrol Census date Class end date Mode Of Delivery Class Summary
2892 24 Feb 2020 02 Mar 2020 31 Mar 2020 29 May 2020 In Person N/A

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