• Offered by ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences and the ANU Law School
  • ANU College ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences / ANU College of Law
  • Course subject Laws
  • Academic career UGRD
  • Mode of delivery In Person
  • Co-taught Course

This course forms part of a new interdisciplinary and cross-College initiative. It introduces students to major research now undertaken that reflects the view that law is neither divorced from nor above the cultural forces and representations all around us. Whether as a lawyer, an activist, a politician, a writer, a diplomat, or a citizen, we face a global world whose enormous challenges will require of us the ability to understand the relationship between legal discourse and other discourses such as art, human rights and literature which responses to these challenges. Human rights offers a legal and moral framework that attempts to address experiences of injustice, suffering, and traumatic loss. To address these effectively we need to draw on a range of vocabularies and discourses, and be able to mediate between them—to compare, contrast and evaluate their meanings and impacts.  In Literature Law and Human Rights, we study the representation, advocacy and critique of human rights in different genres, including their treatment in law and literature, including film and the visual arts.  Each of these forms of storytelling are devised to solicit strong reactions in an audience. Whether in Palestine, Africa, or Alice Springs, law, literature and human rights are different languages for expressing injustice and for demanding redress.  Each are powerful in their own way. A lawyer, an activist, a novelist, and a film-maker are all storytellers with specific means at their disposal, and specific goals in mind. But just what kinds of storytelling are they? How do they differ from one another, and how do they influence one another?  In what ways does literature (in the broadest sense) help organize our understanding of human rights, and mobilize legal responses? And on the other hand, in what ways does law constitute a literature of human rights, and with what consequences?

 

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

By the conclusion of this course, students who have successfully completed all of the requirements will have the knowledge and skills to:

1. Define and critically analyse keywords and concepts shared across the disciplines of law, literature and human rights, including testimony, witness, reconciliation, memory, justice, and recognition

2. Compare, contrast and reflect on contemporary scholarship on and critical approaches to human rights and humanitarian intervention

3. Recognise, distinguish and appraise research and methods in the fields of law and literature, memory studies, and theory, with specific reference to major case studies chosen to illustrate, particularize, and interrogate core concepts and historical episodes

4. Analyse the discourses and genres that intersect in constructing the relationship between law, literature, and human rights.

5. Evaluate and compare a complex variety of textual sources—laws, legal decisions, and commissions of inquiry, as well as novels, films, and artworks—and to critically analyse and reflect on their strategies, blind spots, problems, and effects.

6. Independently problem-solve by evaluating, planning, and executing advanced interdisciplinary scholarship and research

Indicative Assessment

1. Short response essays 3 x 300 words 15%
[ILO 1, 2, 4]

2. Methods essay 1,200 words 20%
[ILO 2, 3, 4, 5]

3. Research essay 2,500 words 55%
[ILO 1—6, esp. 3, 5, 6]

4. Class participation 10%
[ILO 1—6]

The ANU uses Turnitin to enhance student citation and referencing techniques, and to assess assignment submissions as a component of the University's approach to managing Academic Integrity. While the use of Turnitin is not mandatory, the ANU highly recommends Turnitin is used by both teaching staff and students. For additional information regarding Turnitin please visit the ANU Online website.

Workload

This course will consist of the equivalent of 3 contact hours per week.
Students are generally expected to devote at least 10 hours overall per week to this course.

Requisite and Incompatibility

To enrol in this course you must be studying a: Bachelor of Laws (LLB, LLB(H)) and have completed or be completing five 1000 level LAWS courses; OR Juris Doctor (7330XJD, 7330HJD or MJD) and have completed or be completing five 1000 or 6100 level LAWS courses; OR Juris Doctor - online (MJDOL) and have completed LAWS8712 Australian Public Law and International Law B. You are not able to enrol in this course if you have previously completed ENGL3037 Literature, Law and Human Rights.

Fees

Tuition fees are for the academic year indicated at the top of the page.  

If you are a domestic graduate coursework or international student you will be required to pay tuition fees. Tuition fees are indexed annually. Further information for domestic and international students about tuition and other fees can be found at Fees.

Student Contribution Band:
3
Unit value:
6 units

If you are an undergraduate student and have been offered a Commonwealth supported place, your fees are set by the Australian Government for each course. At ANU 1 EFTSL is 48 units (normally 8 x 6-unit courses). You can find your student contribution amount for each course at Fees.  Where there is a unit range displayed for this course, not all unit options below may be available.

Units EFTSL
6.00 0.12500
Note: Please note that fee information is for current year only.

Offerings, Dates and Class Summary Links

There are no current offerings for this course.

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