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single degree

Bachelor of Science (Psychology)

A single three year undergraduate degree offered by the ANU College of Health and Medicine

BSCPSYC
  • Length 3 year full-time
  • Minimum 144 Units
Admission requirements
  • Length 3 year full-time
  • Minimum 144 Units
Admission requirements

Program Requirements

The Bachelor of Science (Psychology) requires completion of 144 units, of which:

A maximum of 60 units may come from completion of 1000-level courses

The 144 units must include:

60 units from the completion of the following compulsory courses:

PSYC1003 Psychology 1: Understanding Mind, Brain and Behaviour

PSYC1004 Psychology 2: Understanding People in Context

PSYC2001 Social Psychology

PSYC2002 Developmental Psychology

PSYC2007 Biological Basis of Behaviour

PSYC2008 Cognition

PSYC2009 Quantitative Methods in Psychology

PSYC3018 Advanced Research Methods

PSYC3025 Psychopathology Across the Lifespan

PSYC3026 Personality Psychology

18 units from completion of 3000-level courses in the subject area PSYC Psychology

12 units from completion of further 1000-level courses from the Science Course List

6 units from completion of further courses from the Science Course List

 

48 units from completion of elective courses offered by ANU

 

Elective Study

Once you have met the program requirements of your degree, you may have enough electives to complete an additional elective majorminor or specialisation.

Study Options

Year 1 48 units PSYC1003 Psychology 1: Understanding Mind, Brain and Behaviour 6 units 1000 level Science elective 6 units Science or non-Science elective 6 units Science or non-Science elective 6 units
PSYC1004 Psychology 2: Understanding People in Context 6 units 1000 level Science elective 6 units Science or non-Science elective 6 units Science or non-Science elective 6 units
Year 2 48 units PSYC2002 Developmental Psychology 6 units PSYC2009 Quantitative Methods in Psychology 6 units Science elective Science or non-Science elective 6 units
PSYC2001 Social Psychology 6 units PSYC2008 Cognition 6 units PSYC2007 Biological Basis of Behaviour 6 units Science or non-Science elective 6 units
Year 3 48 units PSYC3025 Psychopathology Across the Lifespan 6 units PSYC3018 Advanced Research Methods 6 units 3000 level PSYC course 6 units Science or non-Science elective 6 units
PSYC3026 Personality Psychology 6 units 3000 level PSYC course 6 units 3000 level PSYC course 6 units Science or non-Science elective 6 units

Admission Requirements

Admission to all programs is on a competitive basis. Admission to undergraduate degrees is based on meeting the ATAR requirement or an equivalent rank derived from the following qualifications:
- An Australian year 12 qualification or international equivalent; OR
- A completed Associate Diploma, Associate Degree, AQF Diploma, Diploma, AQF Advanced Diploma, Graduate Certificate or international equivalent; OR
- At least one standard full-time year (1.0 FTE) in a single program of degree level study at an Australian higher education institution or international equivalent; OR
- An approved tertiary preparation course unless subsequent study is undertaken.
Click HERE for further information about domestic admission.
More information about ATAR requirements for individual programs can be found HERE.
The National Register of higher education providers is an authoritative source of information that will help you confirm your institution of choice is registered to deliver higher education in Australia.
The Quality Indicators for Learning and Teaching (QILT) website is HERE. Based on surveys done by thousands of students across Australia you can find out about universities that interest you, doing side-by-side comparisons.
The table below is a guide to the entry level required for domestic applicants. Exact entry level will be set at time of offer.
ATAR display
Domestic applicant entry requirements
Queensland Band equivalents are a guide only - selection is made on an ATAR equivalent that is not available to students.

International applicant entry requirements
International applicants may view further information on admissions requirements at Entry Requirements for International Undergraduate Applicants

The University reserves the right to alter or discontinue its programs as required.

ATAR:
80
International Baccalaureate:
29

Adjustment Factors

Adjustment factors are additional points added to an applicant's Selection Rank (for example an applicant's ATAR). ANU offers adjustment factors based on performance and equity principles, such as for high achievement in nationally strategic senior secondary subjects and for recognition of difficult circumstances that students face in their studies. 

Selection Rank adjustments are granted in accordance with the approved schedules, and no more than 15 (maximum 5 subject/performance-based adjustment factors and maximum 10 equity-based adjustment factors) can be awarded. 

You may be considered for adjustment factors if you have:

  • applied for an eligible ANU Bachelor degree program
  • undertaken Australian Year 12 or the International Baccalaureate
  • achieved an ATAR or equivalent at or above 70
  • not previously attempted tertiary study.

Please visit the ANU Adjustment Factors website for further information.

Commonwealth Supported Place (CSP)

For more information see: http://www.anu.edu.au/students/program-administration/costs-fees

Annual indicative fee for international students
$46,910.00

For further information on International Tuition Fees see: https://www.anu.edu.au/students/program-administration/fees-payments/international-tuition-fees

Fee Information

All students are required to pay the Services and amenities fee (SA Fee)

The annual indicative fee provides an estimate of the program tuition fees for international students and domestic students (where applicable). The annual indicative fee for a program is based on the standard full-time enrolment load of 48 units per year (unless the program duration is less than 48 units). Fees for courses vary by discipline meaning that the fees for a program can vary depending on the courses selected. Course fees are reviewed on an annual basis and typically will increase from year to year. The tuition fees payable are dependent on the year of commencement and the courses selected and are subject to increase during the period of study.

For further information on Fees and Payment please see: https://www.anu.edu.au/students/program-administration/fees-payments

Scholarships

ANU offers a wide range of scholarships to students to assist with the cost of their studies.

Eligibility to apply for ANU scholarships varies depending on the specifics of the scholarship and can be categorised by the type of student you are.  Specific scholarship application process information is included in the relevant scholarship listing.

For further information see the Scholarships website.

What makes the human brain tick?

Find out with the Bachelor of Science (Psychology), which provides you with a great base in six different areas of psychology: developmental, social, personality, methods, cognition and biological.

In your later year courses, you’ll apply this knowledge and your skills in more specialised areas such as neuroscience, counselling, health and organisational (business) psychology.

Once you’ve completed your third year, you can apply to undertake an Honours year and pursue further postgraduate study. This will allow you to practice as a clinical psychologist.

Find out more about psychology, the degree structure, the university experience, career opportunities and student stories on our website.

Get the inside story on what it’s like to be an ANU student by visiting our student blog.

Career Options

ANU ranks among the world's very finest universities. Our nearly 100,000 alumni include political, business, government, and academic leaders around the world.

We have graduated remarkable people from every part of our continent, our region and all walks of life.

Employment Opportunities

Psychology graduates have skills essential to any workplace: an understanding of human motivation and behaviour, analytical skills and statistics.

The Bachelor of Science (Psychology) is a fantastic launch pad for a range of careers, including research, management consulting, human resources, marketing, public policy, child development and welfare, health and human services, education, counselling and clinical practice. 

See where a Bachelor of Science (Psychology) could take you: our career wheel will help you turn your interests into a career in science.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Plan and engage in an independent and sustained critical investigation and evaluation of a chosen research topic
  2. Systematically identify relevant theory and concepts, relate these to appropriate methodologies and evidence, and draw appropriate conclusions
  3. Engage in critical review of appropriate and relevant information sources
  4. Communicate concepts and results clearly and effectively both in writing and orally
  5. Record original data and apply statistical or other evaluation processes to original data when appropriate

Inherent Requirements

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Further Information

Important fee information for commencing and continuing domestic undergraduate students intending to study psychology as a professional pathway:

Please note that due to changes in Australian government funding from 2021 as a result of the Job Ready Graduates Package, fees for Behavioural Science courses will be invoiced at different rates. This will affect students in the following manner:

Commencing Students

Study of the accredited sequence of psychology courses taken under the psychology degrees recognised by the Australian Government will be eligible for the Professional Pathway funding rates (HECS band 2). At ANU, these programs are:

  • Bachelor Science (Psychology) - (3 year degree)
  • Bachelor of Science (Psychology) (Honours) - (+1 Hons year)
  • Bachelor of Psychology (Honours) - (4 year degree incl Honours).

Note that Bachelor of Science (Psychology) (Honours) students who commenced their Bachelor of Science (Psychology) at ANU prior to 1 January 2021will be classed as continuing students. 

While the accredited sequence of psychology courses can be taken as part of other programs of study at ANU [Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science (Honours), Bachelor of Science (Advanced) (Honours), Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Arts (Honours) and Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours)], the study of psychology is not compulsory therefore Psychology courses in these programs will be charged different fees (HECS band 4).

Continuing students

Continuing students (enrolled before 1 January 2021) studying courses in disciplines with increased student contribution amounts, will be grandfathered under the legislation. That is, they will continue paying the same amount as they would have, had these reforms not been implemented for any courses that would otherwise have an increased student contribution. 

 

For more information on the 2021 fee changes to Student Contributions Amounts, please visit https://www.anu.edu.au/students/program-administration/fees-payments/student-contributions; and for more information on the Job Ready Graduates Package please visit  https://www.studyassist.gov.au/

Back to the Bachelor of Science (Psychology) page

Please note that if you are commencing your studies in semester 2 there may be restrictions on the courses available for enrolment. We strongly recommend that you make an appointment with an academic advisor. You can make an appointment by using our online booking system here. Alternatively, you can call Science Central on 6125 2809. There will also be advisory sessions offered during the week before semester commences.

What is consciousness? Do people see colours the same way? How do we make decisions?

Contrary to popular belief most psychologists work with healthy people, trying to find the answers to questions like these.

Studying psychology at ANU will expose you to a wide range of psychological sciences, covering topics as varied as how groups interact, vision and how it can be tricked to see what is not really there, how the brain develops as a baby and how it will change again as you get older, how impulses are carried from brain to muscle, and how things go wrong in abnormal psychology.

The ANU Bachelor of Science (Psychology) teaches you skills sought after by employers including statistics and experimental design, critical thinking and communication, and provides an excellent grounding to enter the workforce or continue with further study.

Single degree

  • This degree requires 144 units
  • A maximum of 60 units of 1000 level courses of which 24 units must be Science
  • A minimum of 36 units 3000 level PSYC courses
  • Completion of the accredited sequence of psychology courses
  • Other courses from the Science course list or another ANU College (48 units maximum of non-science courses allowed)

Double degree

  • This degree requires 96 units Science courses
  • A maximum of 36 units of 1000 level Science courses
  • A minimum of 36 units 3000 level PSYC courses
  • Completion of the accredited sequence of psychology courses
  • Other courses from the Science course list

About this degree

Single degree

In a Bachelor of Science (Psychology) single degree program you will study a total of 144 units.  Typically you will take 4 courses per semester (total of 24 units) as a full time student giving you a total of 24 courses across your whole degree.

You will need to complete a minimum of 16 science courses (96 units) including the following accredited courses:

PSYC1003 Psychology 1

PSYC1004 Psychology 2

PSYC2001 Social Psychology

PSYC2002 Developmental Psychology

PSYC2007 Biological Basis of Behaviour

PSYC2008 Cognition

PSYC2009 Quantitative Methods in Psychology

PSYC3018 Advanced Research Methods

PSYC3025 Psychopathology across the Life Span

PSYC3026 Personality Psychology

You will also get to choose eight courses (48 units) from other ANU Colleges.  You can try a range of courses or take a major or minor in a non-Science subject, such as history or marketing. The choice is yours.

Double degree

In a Bachelor of Science (Psychology) double degree program you will study a total of 96 units including all the courses listed above. Typically you will take 4 courses per semester (total of 24 units) as a full time student giving you a total of 16 courses across your whole degree.  However, for each semester you are likely to take 2 courses from your Science (Psychology) degree and then 2 courses from the other half of your double degree – still a total of 4 courses a semester.

Enrolment Status

It is possible to enrol in fewer courses per semester but it will take you longer to finish your program and get your degree. If you are an international student you must always be enrolled full-time in 24 units each semester.

  • You need to enrol in courses for both First Semester and Second Semester.
  • You can’t study more than four courses (24 units) per semester, eight for the year.
  • You may take 1000-level courses later in your program.  But remember you can’t count more than ten 1000-level courses (60 units) towards your single degree or six 1000-level courses (36 units) towards your Science (Psychology) half of the double degree.

Important things to keep in mind when choosing your 1000-level courses

There are two compulsory 1000 level courses you must take in your first year:

Electives

Remember you can choose up to 8 courses from another ANU College if you are undertaking the single Bachelor of Science (Psychology) program.

Study Options

Bachelor of Science (Psychology) - single degree

This is a typical study pattern for the first year of a student undertaking a Bachelor of Science (Psychology).

Study Options

Year 1 48 units PSYC1003 Psychology 1: Understanding Mind, Brain and Behaviour 6 units 1000 level Science elective 6 units Science or non-science course 6 units Science or non-science course 6 units
PSYC1004 Psychology 2: Understanding People in Context 6 units 1000 level Science elective 6 units Science or non-science course 6 units Science or non-science course 6 units

Bachelor of Science (Psychology) - double degree

This is a typical study pattern for the first year of a student undertaking a Bachelor of Science (Psychology) with another three year degree, such as the Bachelor of Arts.

Study Options

Year 1 48 units PSYC1003 Psychology 1: Understanding Mind, Brain and Behaviour 6 units 1000 level Science elective 6 units Degree B Course 6 units Degree B Course 6 units
PSYC1004 Psychology 2: Understanding People in Context 6 units 1000 level Science elective 6 units Degree B Course 6 units Degree B Course 6 units

Academic Advice

For further information, you can:

  • Visit the Research School of Psychology webpage here, or
  • Download the Science first year course guide available here, or
  • View our program presentation videos located on our New commencers & first year students page, or
  • Email us at science.enquiries@anu.edu.au, or
  • Come and talk to someone face-to-face. You can make an appointment with an academic advisor here or by calling Science Central on 6125 2809.

Do you want to talk to someone before enrolling?

Contact phb.science.enquiries@anu.edu.au

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