• Code ASIA8028
  • Unit Value 6 to 12 units
  • Offered by School of Culture History and Language
  • ANU College ANU College of Asia and the Pacific
  • Course subject Asian Studies
  • Areas of interest Non Language Asian Studies
  • Academic career PGRD
  • Course convener
    • Dr Peter Hendriks
  • Mode of delivery In Person
  • Offered in Summer Session 2015
    First Semester 2015
    Autumn Session 2015
    Winter Session 2015
    Second Semester 2015
    Spring Session 2015
    See Future Offerings

This is a shell course complementing the suite of flexible single issue elective courses grouped around the compulsory core coursework. The concept is to be able to respond to current issues that emerge as a result of regional dynamics. The course would normally be offered on campus but may be wholly or partly delivered in-country depending on the nature of the topic.

The topics will vary for year to year and will generally be announced in the October before teaching begins.

 

Topic

 

The Trobriand Islands Revisited

The Trobriand Islanders of Papua New Guinea are among the most ethnographically well-studied peoples of the world, thanks to the pioneering fieldwork of Bronislaw Malinowski and subsequent investigators. Despite how much is known about the Trobriands, the culture has presented anthropologists with numerous outstanding ethnographic puzzles which have generated some of anthropology’s most colorful debates concerning procreation beliefs (‘virgin birth’),  ‘mother right’ versus ‘father love’,  the cross-cultural ‘Oedipal-Electra complex’, spirit reincarnation, gender hierarchy, the logic of mortuary ritual, Pacific chieftainship, political/cosmological power, the nature of magic, ‘primitive sexuality’ and ‘free love’, systems of gift exchange, the meaning of ‘primitive art’, etc. This seminar course will take a fresh in-depth look at Trobriand culture and social organization, focusing on several of the main points of controversy in the extant ethnography guided by new field and archival research conducted over the past eight years by the Instructor.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

Generic

Due to the individual nature of this course it is not possible to provide an exclusive list of learning outcomes. However, the following is an indicative list of possible outcomes. it is expected that on successful completion of this course students should be able to:
1. identify issues of interest in the field under consideration;
2. discuss these issues coherently and persuasively;
3. assess arguments made in the field;
4. explain the complex attitudes people have to these issues;
5. analyse and compare relevant data;
6. collaborate with other students and staff to select and combine materials for a case study;
7. research, present and justify the results of your collaboration with other students and staff with respect to the case studies;
8. reflect on and articulate how your own views on the field have developed over the course of the semester

Introductory Tibetan

By the end of this course, students will be able to read and write Tibetan in the dBu chen script.  They will also be able to conduct basic conversations in Tibetan, pronounced in modern, standard form.  As this course will focus on the particles that play a predominant role in both contemporary and classical Tibetan composition, they will also be able to read elementary Tibetan texts with the aid of an instructor.

Indicative Assessment

Introductory Tibetan

-Nightly Homework  35%

-Pronunciation Check-up [Friday, Week One] 10%

-Midway exam (includes oral interview) [Monday, Week Three] 15%

-Final exam (including basic translation) [Friday, Weed Three] 20%

-Participation and Attendance 20%

The ANU uses Turnitin to enhance student citation and referencing techniques, and to assess assignment submissions as a component of the University's approach to managing Academic Integrity. While the use of Turnitin is not mandatory, the ANU highly recommends Turnitin is used by both teaching staff and students. For additional information regarding Turnitin please visit the ANU Online website.

Workload

Varies depending on topic and whether offered as an intensive or semester-length course.

Refer to the course content and structure of each topic.

Requisite and Incompatibility

You will need to contact the School of Culture History and Language to request a permission code to enrol in this course.

Prescribed Texts

Introductory Tibetan:

Tournadre Nicolas and Sangda Dorje. 2003. Manual of Standard Tibetan. Ithaca: Snow Lion.

[With supplementary materials supplied in class and via Wattle.]

Fees

Tuition fees are for the academic year indicated at the top of the page.  

If you are a domestic graduate coursework or international student you will be required to pay tuition fees. Tuition fees are indexed annually. Further information for domestic and international students about tuition and other fees can be found at Fees.

Student Contribution Band:
1
Unit value:
6 to 12 units

If you are an undergraduate student and have been offered a Commonwealth supported place, your fees are set by the Australian Government for each course. At ANU 1 EFTSL is 48 units (normally 8 x 6-unit courses). You can find your student contribution amount for each course at Fees.  Where there is a unit range displayed for this course, not all unit options below may be available.

Units EFTSL
6.00 0.12500
7.00 0.14583
8.00 0.16667
9.00 0.18750
10.00 0.20833
11.00 0.22917
12.00 0.25000
Domestic fee paying students
Year Fee
2015 $493 per unit
International fee paying students
Year Fee
2015 $725 per unit
Note: Please note that fee information is for current year only.

Offerings, Dates and Class Summary Links

The list of offerings for future years is indicative only.
Class summaries, if available, can be accessed by clicking on the View link for the relevant class number.

Summer Session

Class number Class start date Last day to enrol Census date Class end date Mode Of Delivery Class Summary
1550 01 Jan 2015 23 Jan 2015 23 Jan 2015 31 Mar 2015 In Person N/A

First Semester

Class number Class start date Last day to enrol Census date Class end date Mode Of Delivery Class Summary
1388 16 Feb 2015 06 Mar 2015 31 Mar 2015 29 May 2015 In Person N/A

Autumn Session

Class number Class start date Last day to enrol Census date Class end date Mode Of Delivery Class Summary
1591 01 Apr 2015 24 Apr 2015 24 Apr 2015 30 Jun 2015 In Person N/A

Winter Session

Class number Class start date Last day to enrol Census date Class end date Mode Of Delivery Class Summary
Pols, IR & Pol Econ of Contemp China
1500 01 Jul 2015 24 Jul 2015 24 Jul 2015 30 Sep 2015 In Person N/A
1589 01 Jul 2015 24 Jul 2015 24 Jul 2015 30 Sep 2015 In Person N/A

Second Semester

Class number Class start date Last day to enrol Census date Class end date Mode Of Delivery Class Summary
Advanced Forensic Linguistics
1638 20 Jul 2015 07 Aug 2015 31 Aug 2015 30 Oct 2015 In Person N/A

Spring Session

Class number Class start date Last day to enrol Census date Class end date Mode Of Delivery Class Summary
1503 01 Oct 2015 23 Oct 2015 23 Oct 2015 31 Dec 2015 In Person N/A

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